CUNY Graduate Center Collection, 34th Street

This collection is a collaborative project between the Mina Rees Library, the Seymour B. Durst Old York Library, and the Gotham Center for New York City History, is a montage of 246 images of Thirty-fourth Street, past and present. Contemporary images were taken by photographer Jeanette O’Keefe during the summer of 2010. These color street shots contrast beautifully with the historic images of Thirty-fourth.

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Herald Square and Broadway, north at 33rd St.
33rd Street and Broadway. Image shows Saks 34th Street, Sixth Ave. el train, McAlpin Hotel, Wilson Building, Herald Building and Times Building.
Herald Square, where Broadway Meets Sixth Avenue.
Broadway and Sixth Avenue. General view of Herald Square, New York City. The famous department stores, Gimbel's and Saks appear on the left, the well known Hotel McAlpin is on the right.
Herald Square.
Herald Square from Broadway, North at 33rd Street.
Herald Towers.
Herald Towers Condominiums formerly the Hotel McAlpin, 50 West 34th Street.
Hotel Governor Clinton superimposed on a map showing it in relation to the New York World's Fair grounds.
Seventh Avenue at 31st Street. Postcard shows how easy it is for those staying at the hotel to walk across the street to Penn Station and catch the subway to the fair grounds. The Long Island Railroad and the I.R.T. (Interborough Rapid Transit) lines are drawn from Penn Station to the fair grounds. "10 miles in 10 minutes--10 cents direct to World's Fair."
Hotel Governor Clinton, New York, Opposite Pennsylvania Station (back)
Back of postcard has a personal note addressed to Lena in Forth Worth, Texas, "Dear Lena, Dog gone it Lena, you get all the dates while I am gone. I can't even give you any competition at all. Isn't that terrible? Well, may the best man win. Had a long ride here. Hope you are well. Love, Al."
Hotel Governor Clinton, New York, Opposite Pennsylvania Station.
Seventh Avenue at 31st Street. Color postcard of the Hotel Governor Clinton, "New York's newest and finest. 1200 rooms, all outside; 1200 baths; 5 restaurants; bar and cocktail lounge; all air-conditioned. Rates from $3.30. Robert J. Glenn, manager." The hotel was built in 1929. The colonnade of Penn Station is across Seventh Avenue on the right. The hotel is now the Affinia Manhattan Hotel.
Hotel Martinique.
Exterior view of Hotel Martinique, 49 West 32nd Street.
Hotel McAlpin Broadway and 34th Street. One of New York’s most prominent hotels. In the heart of the shopping and midtown business districts and convenient to all amusements.
The Hotel McAlpin on the corner of Broadway and 34th Street. The street scene includes automobiles, buses, pedestrian traffic and on the lower right hand corner a glimpse of the Broadway El.
Hotel McAlpin, Broadway and 34th Street. One of New York's most prominent hotels. In the heart of the shopping and midtown business districts and convenient to all amusements.
Broadway and 34th Street. Exterior view of hotel showing streetcars and an elevated railroad car in lower right hand corner.
Hotel Pennsylvania, 33rd Street, opposite Pennsylvania Railroad depot.
Hotel Pennsylvania, at 33rd Street and Seventh Avenue, opposite the Pennsylvania Railroad depot, with which it is connected by an underground passageway. The first section on Seventh Avenue, 20 stories high, contains 1,000 bedrooms with bath and shower. Exceptionally favored for sunshine and air.
In the Turkish Room of the Waldorf-Astoria.
A drawing of a hotel salon decorated in a "Turkish" style. Fifth Avenue and 34th Street
Interior of Altman Department Store.
365 Fifth Avenue. Interior of B. Altman Department Store featuring the building's original rotunda and three floors of merchandise.
Interior of Koster and Bial's Music Hall.
Broadway and 34th Street. Interior view of Koster and Bail's Music Hall from the stage toward the audience. Six levels of seating are visible including ornate box seats, mezzanine seating and high balcony bench-style seating. A prominent vaudeville venue from 1893 to 1901, this theatre was demolished in order to build Macy's Department Store.
Interior view of Pennsylvania Station concourse.
West 34th Street and Seventh Avenue. Interior image of the Pennsylvania Station concourse showing the vaulted ceiling, clock and travelers. It is prime example of the Beaux-Arts interior styling for which McKim, Mead & White were renowned. Constructed of steel, glass and travertine, the space was modeled after the Roman Baths of Caracalla and was one of the largest indoor public spaces in the world at the time.
James McCreery & Co.
An advertisement (from a pamphlet) for the McCreery Department Store, Fifth Avenue and 34th Street, a prominent dry goods merchant which occupied this ten-story retail edifice.
Javits Center.
37th Street, North side, between Tenth and Eleventh Avenues. The Jacob K. Javits Convention Center is on the West Side of Manhattan. The Center is currently undergoing an expansion project that should be completed by the fall of 2013. Eleventh Avenue traffic is in the foreground.
Keens Steakhouse exterior, 72 West 36th Street.
Exterior view of Keens Steakhouse, which was formerly the Lambs Club, the oldest social club for professionals in the performing arts in the United States.
Keens Steakhouse interior, 72 West 36th Street.
Interior view of Keens Steakhouse, which was formerly the Lambs Club, the oldest social club for professionals in the performing arts in the United States.
Koster and Bial’s Music Hall, 34th Street and Broadway
Commemorative plaque with the inscription: Here the motion picture began on the night of April 23, 1896 on this site in Koster & Bial’s Music Hall Thomas A. Edison with the Vitascope first projected a moving picture.
Lew Fields Herald Square Theatre.
Broadway and 35th Street. The musical "Country Girl" is playing at the theatre.
Lew Fields, Herald Square Theatre, Broadway and 35th Street
Program for an "English Musical Entertainment" entitled "The Orchard" starring Eddie Foy, presented by Sam S. & Lee Shubert (inc) for week beginning Monday, July 1, 1907.
Lobby of the Empire State Building (back)
The back of the postcard has a note written to Miss Laura M. Horton of Albany, Oregon, "Had Marlene and Debbie over here today. Dottie is sick, so Lillian stayed home with her. It is sure windy up here today and really cool. Hope you arrive home safely." It is signed Lillian.
Lobby of the Empire State Building.
This postcard shows the lobby of the Empire State Building, 350 Fifth Avenue, between 33rd and 34th Streets. The building became a state landmark in 1981 and a national landmark in 1986. "This postcard purchased atop Empire State Building, N.Y.C." No. 7
Looking up Herald Square – Thirty-fourth Street stood up like a ridge out of a great hole.
Sixth Avenue and 34th Street. This is a long view of Herald Square looking from south to north. Elevated subway tracks and the Broadway Tabernacle are visible on the right and excavation for the IRT on the left. Macy's is not yet in evidence but may be under construction. There is signage announcing that Saks & Co. is to be built on the site. There are billboards and many theatre posters visible.
M'Adoo Tunnel; Morton Street tubes completed; Cortlandt Street tubes under way. M'Adoo Terminal, 6th Ave. and 33d St.; Penna. Tunnels on lowest level; proposed municipal subway; M'Adoo subway terminus; surface lines; 6th Ave., "L" and bridge over "L."
Sixth Avenue and 33rd Street. Illustrated cross-section of one of the "Hudson tubes," which are now operated as part of the Port Authority Trans-Hudson (PATH) system as well as the Penn station terminal. The two passenger railway tubes were completed and opened in 1908. Their construction was overseen by William M'Adoo, President of the Hudson and Manhattan Railroad Company who later went on to become Secretary of the Treasury under President Wilson from 1913-1918 and Director of the United States Railroad Administration (USRA) from 1917-1918.
Macy's Christmas Gifts Catalogue.
Broadway and 34th Street. Macy's exterior view, detail of 34th Street entrance with clock.
Macy's Department Store.
151 West 34th Street. Photograph of the Broadway façade of Macy's department store with pedestrian and automobile traffic.
Macy's Department Store.
Photograph of Macy's 34th Street entrance and façade, 151 West 34th Street.
Macy's Department Store.
Photograph of the Broadway entrance to Macy's Department store, 151 West 34th Street.
Macy's exterior view, "The largest retail establishment under one roof in this country. Covering 24 acres of floor space. Broadway at Sixth Avenue, 34th St. to 35th St."
Illustration of exterior view of Macy's department store with streetcars and horse-drawn carriages. Broadway and 34th Street.
Macy's exterior view.
151 West 34th Street. Exterior shot of Macy’s Department store on 34th Street and Broadway with the prominent R.H. Macy & Co. sign. The bustling scene on the street surrounding the building includes pedestrians, horses and carriages and the street railroad.
Madison Avenue at 36th Street during the late 19th Century.
The cityscape contains mansions, brownstones, churches, a lamplighter, a horse and dray delivery wagon and pedestrians.
Madison Square Garden entrance, eagle sculptures mounted on raised beds north of 7th Avenue.
Eagle sculpture that was once part of the old Penn Station.
Main Entrance, Stewart's Hotel for Working Women.
Illustration of main entrance to the Women's Hotel, Fourth Avenue, 32nd and 33rd Streets. Stewart's Hotel for Working Women was commissioned by the wealthy merchant, A.T. Stewart. The hotel opened in 1877 to provide safe housing for the influx of working women into the city. It was soon reopened as a regular hotel in 1878 and renamed the Park Avenue Hotel. The building was demolished in 1927.
Manhattan Center - exterior detail.
311 West 34th Street. Detail of a lion water spout on façade of building. In 1922 the Manhattan Opera House was purchased by the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite of Free Masonry. The Masons built a new building façade with the inscription "Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite" which can still be seen today. The Lion may be a reference to Masonic handshake known as "The Lion's Paw".
Manhattan Center - exterior.
Exterior view of the Manhattan Center, 311 West 34th Street. First built as the Manhattan Opera House by Oscar Hammerstein I in 1906. In 1922 the Manhattan Opera House was purchased by the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite of Free Masonry. The Masons built a new building façade with the inscription "Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite" which can still be seen today.
Manhattan Center - interior.
Interior view of the Manhattan Center Hammerstein Ballroom, 311 West 34th Street.
Manhattan Market.
Image is an illustration of a street scene in front of the Manhattan Market which was located at 34th Street and 11th Avenue.
Manhattan Opera House, New York
311 West 34th Street. Color postcard of the Manhattan Opera House now the Manhattan Center. The building was designed by the architectural firm of J. B. McElfatrick and Sons and was built by Oscar Hammerstein in 1906 to rival the Metropolitan Opera House.
Map of Midtown Manhattan down to Greenwich Village.
Nineteenth-century map of Midtown Manhattan extending to Greenwich Village.
Map of Midtown Manhattan, from 29th Street through 35th Street and from 6th Avenue to 9th Avenue.
This map represents 34th Street and shows what Midtown Manhattan's 20th Ward looked like in 1867. Various businesses are visible: a granite mill, ironworks, a rice mill, a boiler shop, a stone yard, a coal company, railroad yards and the railroad depot (between 9th & 10th Avenues).
Map of Midtown Manhattan, from 34th Street to 59th Street and from 1st Avenue to 6th Avenue.
Nineteenth-century map of Midtown Manhattan extending from 34th Street to 59th Street and from First Avenue to Sixth Avenue.
Map of area surrounding Waldorf building.
Depicts location of retail and other businesses in the area. Sales prospectus booklet "Waldorf Building: 33rd Street-Fifth Avenue, New York City" inside front cover.
Map of the Murray Hill Farm, Ogden Place Farm, Lawrence & Astor, Wiswell & Price, Corporation Wm. Wright, John Taylor and other property.
A map showing the Midtown Manhattan area in 1867, well before commerce transformed it into skyscrapers and department stores. The farms are being divided into individual allotments to create housing and businesses. Murray Hill area, between 33rd through 35 Streets and between Broadway and Lexington Avenue.
Marble Mansion at the corner of Fifth Avenue and Thirty-fourth Street erected by the late Mr. A.T. Stewart.
Image shows the 4th Avenue carline tunnel and Presbyterian Church of the Covenant in distance, which was located at 34th and Park Avenue.
Minerva and the Bell Ringers.
Bronze statue of Minerva and the Bell Ringers that is part of the James Gordon Bennett Memorial in Herald Square, Sixth Avenue and 34th Street. The statue was sculpted by Antonin Jean Carles and was once part of the New York Herald Building.
NY Institution for the Blind, Ninth Avenue and 34th Street
NY Institution for the Blind, looking se from 9th avenue, ca. 1926.

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