General Society of Mechanics and Tradesmen, Industry and Culture Collection

Established in 1785, The General Society of Mechanics and Tradesmen (GSMT) is a non-profit organization serving the people of the City of New York for over two centuries, through educational, cultural and philanthropic programs. The 364 objects in the Industry and Culture Collection highlight items of institutional, metropolitan and national history held in the Society’s archival and museum collections.

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Benjamin Franklin Correspondence
Specifications written by Benjamin Franklin for his printing house dated October 25, 1753.
Berkeley School Drill
Photograph of a military drill at Berkeley School. The space the drill is taking place in is now the library for the General Society of Mechanics and Tradesmen.
Berkeley School, 44th St., 1894
Exterior shot of The Berkeley School for Boys located at No. 20 West 44th Street, South Side. This is the building that the General Society of Mechanics and Tradesmen moved into in 1899. The building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
Betsy Ross Showing the First U.S. Flag
Lantern slide depicting Betsy Ross showing her U.S. flag to American military officials. On June 1, 1777, Congress adopted the flag of thirteen stars and stripes as made by Betsy Ross. The lantern slides were a gift of Mr. Frederic W. Thomas given to GSMT on May 25, 1928 and were used in a lecture on the American Revolution called 'One Flag. One Country, One People'. Slide number 37.
Bike Track Grand Stand
Glass plate negative depicting scenes from the construction of Blackwell's Island Bridge in 1895, a cantilever bridge that connects Queens to Manhattan. The bridge, now called the Queensboro Bridge (its official name being the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge) was offically completed in 1909. However, the state charter to build the bridge was given on April 16, 1867, with the contract awarded to begin construction on March 25, 1881. Due to financial and legal issues, construction kept starting and stopping. These negatives depict the construction that took place in 1895, which was later halted. The name of the bridge was given for the name of the the island, Blackwell's Island, siutated in the East River between Manhattan and Queens that the bridges mid-river supporting piers were built on. The island today is called Roosevelt Island.
Bike Track Grand Stand Birds Eye View
Glass plate negative depicting scenes from the construction of Blackwell's Island Bridge in 1895, a cantilever bridge that connects Queens to Manhattan. The bridge, now called the Queensboro Bridge (its official name being the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge) was offically completed in 1909. However, the state charter to build the bridge was given on April 16, 1867, with the contract awarded to begin construction on March 25, 1881. Due to financial and legal issues, construction kept starting and stopping. These negatives depict the construction that took place in 1895, which was later halted. The name of the bridge was given for the name of the the island, Blackwell's Island, siutated in the East River between Manhattan and Queens that the bridges mid-river supporting piers were built on. The island today is called Roosevelt Island.
Bike Track from Circus Building
Glass plate negative depicting scenes from the construction of Blackwell's Island Bridge in 1895, a cantilever bridge that connects Queens to Manhattan. The bridge, now called the Queensboro Bridge (its official name being the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge) was offically completed in 1909. However, the state charter to build the bridge was given on April 16, 1867, with the contract awarded to begin construction on March 25, 1881. Due to financial and legal issues, construction kept starting and stopping. These negatives depict the construction that took place in 1895, which was later halted. The name of the bridge was given for the name of the the island, Blackwell's Island, siutated in the East River between Manhattan and Queens that the bridges mid-river supporting piers were built on. The island today is called Roosevelt Island.
Blackwells Island Bridge Model
Glass plate negative depicting scenes from the construction of Blackwell's Island Bridge in 1895, a cantilever bridge that connects Queens to Manhattan. The bridge, now called the Queensboro Bridge (its official name being the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge) was offically completed in 1909. However, the state charter to build the bridge was given on April 16, 1867, with the contract awarded to begin construction on March 25, 1881. Due to financial and legal issues, construction kept starting and stopping. These negatives depict the construction that took place in 1895, which was later halted. The name of the bridge was given for the name of the the island, Blackwell's Island, siutated in the East River between Manhattan and Queens that the bridges mid-river supporting piers were built on. The island today is called Roosevelt Island.
Blackwells Island Bridge, Bottom of Pit Pier 3 Men Working
Glass plate negative depicting scenes from the construction of Blackwell's Island Bridge in 1895, a cantilever bridge that connects Queens to Manhattan. The bridge, now called the Queensboro Bridge (its official name being the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge) was offically completed in 1909. However, the state charter to build the bridge was given on April 16, 1867, with the contract awarded to begin construction on March 25, 1881. Due to financial and legal issues, construction kept starting and stopping. These negatives depict the construction that took place in 1895, which was later halted. The name of the bridge was given for the name of the the island, Blackwell's Island, siutated in the East River between Manhattan and Queens that the bridges mid-river supporting piers were built on. The island today is called Roosevelt Island.
Blackwells Island Bridge, Concrete Pier 4
Glass plate negative depicting scenes from the construction of Blackwell's Island Bridge in 1895, a cantilever bridge that connects Queens to Manhattan. The bridge, now called the Queensboro Bridge (its official name being the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge) was offically completed in 1909. However, the state charter to build the bridge was given on April 16, 1867, with the contract awarded to begin construction on March 25, 1881. Due to financial and legal issues, construction kept starting and stopping. These negatives depict the construction that took place in 1895, which was later halted. The name of the bridge was given for the name of the the island, Blackwell's Island, siutated in the East River between Manhattan and Queens that the bridges mid-river supporting piers were built on. The island today is called Roosevelt Island.
Blackwells Island Bridge, East Channel
Glass plate negative depicting scenes from the construction of Blackwell's Island Bridge in 1895, a cantilever bridge that connects Queens to Manhattan. The bridge, now called the Queensboro Bridge (its official name being the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge) was offically completed in 1909. However, the state charter to build the bridge was given on April 16, 1867, with the contract awarded to begin construction on March 25, 1881. Due to financial and legal issues, construction kept starting and stopping. These negatives depict the construction that took place in 1895, which was later halted. The name of the bridge was given for the name of the the island, Blackwell's Island, siutated in the East River between Manhattan and Queens that the bridges mid-river supporting piers were built on. The island today is called Roosevelt Island.
Blackwells Island Bridge, Men Working
Glass plate negative depicting scenes from the construction of Blackwell's Island Bridge in 1895, a cantilever bridge that connects Queens to Manhattan. The bridge, now called the Queensboro Bridge (its official name being the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge) was offically completed in 1909. However, the state charter to build the bridge was given on April 16, 1867, with the contract awarded to begin construction on March 25, 1881. Due to financial and legal issues, construction kept starting and stopping. These negatives depict the construction that took place in 1895, which was later halted. The name of the bridge was given for the name of the the island, Blackwell's Island, siutated in the East River between Manhattan and Queens that the bridges mid-river supporting piers were built on. The island today is called Roosevelt Island.
Blackwells Island Bridge, Model of Pier
Glass plate negative depicting scenes from the construction of Blackwell's Island Bridge in 1895, a cantilever bridge that connects Queens to Manhattan. The bridge, now called the Queensboro Bridge (its official name being the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge) was offically completed in 1909. However, the state charter to build the bridge was given on April 16, 1867, with the contract awarded to begin construction on March 25, 1881. Due to financial and legal issues, construction kept starting and stopping. These negatives depict the construction that took place in 1895, which was later halted. The name of the bridge was given for the name of the the island, Blackwell's Island, siutated in the East River between Manhattan and Queens that the bridges mid-river supporting piers were built on. The island today is called Roosevelt Island.
Blackwells Island Bridge, Model of Pier Side
Glass plate negative depicting scenes from the construction of Blackwell's Island Bridge in 1895, a cantilever bridge that connects Queens to Manhattan. The bridge, now called the Queensboro Bridge (its official name being the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge) was offically completed in 1909. However, the state charter to build the bridge was given on April 16, 1867, with the contract awarded to begin construction on March 25, 1881. Due to financial and legal issues, construction kept starting and stopping. These negatives depict the construction that took place in 1895, which was later halted. The name of the bridge was given for the name of the the island, Blackwell's Island, siutated in the East River between Manhattan and Queens that the bridges mid-river supporting piers were built on. The island today is called Roosevelt Island.
Blackwells Island Bridge, Pier 3
Glass plate negative depicting scenes from the construction of Blackwell's Island Bridge in 1895, a cantilever bridge that connects Queens to Manhattan. The bridge, now called the Queensboro Bridge (its official name being the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge) was offically completed in 1909. However, the state charter to build the bridge was given on April 16, 1867, with the contract awarded to begin construction on March 25, 1881. Due to financial and legal issues, construction kept starting and stopping. These negatives depict the construction that took place in 1895, which was later halted. The name of the bridge was given for the name of the the island, Blackwell's Island, siutated in the East River between Manhattan and Queens that the bridges mid-river supporting piers were built on. The island today is called Roosevelt Island.
Blackwells Island Bridge, Pier 3 Bottom of Pit
Glass plate negative depicting scenes from the construction of Blackwell's Island Bridge in 1895, a cantilever bridge that connects Queens to Manhattan. The bridge, now called the Queensboro Bridge (its official name being the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge) was offically completed in 1909. However, the state charter to build the bridge was given on April 16, 1867, with the contract awarded to begin construction on March 25, 1881. Due to financial and legal issues, construction kept starting and stopping. These negatives depict the construction that took place in 1895, which was later halted. The name of the bridge was given for the name of the the island, Blackwell's Island, siutated in the East River between Manhattan and Queens that the bridges mid-river supporting piers were built on. The island today is called Roosevelt Island.
Blackwells Island Bridge, Pier 3 Bottom of Pit Men Working
Glass plate negative depicting scenes from the construction of Blackwell's Island Bridge in 1895, a cantilever bridge that connects Queens to Manhattan. The bridge, now called the Queensboro Bridge (its official name being the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge) was offically completed in 1909. However, the state charter to build the bridge was given on April 16, 1867, with the contract awarded to begin construction on March 25, 1881. Due to financial and legal issues, construction kept starting and stopping. These negatives depict the construction that took place in 1895, which was later halted. The name of the bridge was given for the name of the the island, Blackwell's Island, siutated in the East River between Manhattan and Queens that the bridges mid-river supporting piers were built on. The island today is called Roosevelt Island.
Blackwells Island Bridge, Pier 3 Looking Towards New York City
Glass plate negative depicting scenes from the construction of Blackwell's Island Bridge in 1895, a cantilever bridge that connects Queens to Manhattan. The bridge, now called the Queensboro Bridge (its official name being the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge) was offically completed in 1909. However, the state charter to build the bridge was given on April 16, 1867, with the contract awarded to begin construction on March 25, 1881. Due to financial and legal issues, construction kept starting and stopping. These negatives depict the construction that took place in 1895, which was later halted. The name of the bridge was given for the name of the the island, Blackwell's Island, siutated in the East River between Manhattan and Queens that the bridges mid-river supporting piers were built on. The island today is called Roosevelt Island.
Blackwells Island Bridge, Pier 3 Men Working
Glass plate negative depicting scenes from the construction of Blackwell's Island Bridge in 1895, a cantilever bridge that connects Queens to Manhattan. The bridge, now called the Queensboro Bridge (its official name being the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge) was offically completed in 1909. However, the state charter to build the bridge was given on April 16, 1867, with the contract awarded to begin construction on March 25, 1881. Due to financial and legal issues, construction kept starting and stopping. These negatives depict the construction that took place in 1895, which was later halted. The name of the bridge was given for the name of the the island, Blackwell's Island, siutated in the East River between Manhattan and Queens that the bridges mid-river supporting piers were built on. The island today is called Roosevelt Island.
Blackwells Island Bridge, Pier 4
Glass plate negative depicting scenes from the construction of Blackwell's Island Bridge in 1895, a cantilever bridge that connects Queens to Manhattan. The bridge, now called the Queensboro Bridge (its official name being the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge) was offically completed in 1909. However, the state charter to build the bridge was given on April 16, 1867, with the contract awarded to begin construction on March 25, 1881. Due to financial and legal issues, construction kept starting and stopping. These negatives depict the construction that took place in 1895, which was later halted. The name of the bridge was given for the name of the the island, Blackwell's Island, siutated in the East River between Manhattan and Queens that the bridges mid-river supporting piers were built on. The island today is called Roosevelt Island.
Blackwells Island Bridge, Pier 4 Corner Stone
Glass plate negative depicting scenes from the construction of Blackwell's Island Bridge in 1895, a cantilever bridge that connects Queens to Manhattan. The bridge, now called the Queensboro Bridge (its official name being the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge) was offically completed in 1909. However, the state charter to build the bridge was given on April 16, 1867, with the contract awarded to begin construction on March 25, 1881. Due to financial and legal issues, construction kept starting and stopping. These negatives depict the construction that took place in 1895, which was later halted. The name of the bridge was given for the name of the the island, Blackwell's Island, siutated in the East River between Manhattan and Queens that the bridges mid-river supporting piers were built on. The island today is called Roosevelt Island.
Blackwells Island Bridge, Pier 4 Corner Stone Bottom of Pit
Glass plate negative depicting scenes from the construction of Blackwell's Island Bridge in 1895, a cantilever bridge that connects Queens to Manhattan. The bridge, now called the Queensboro Bridge (its official name being the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge) was offically completed in 1909. However, the state charter to build the bridge was given on April 16, 1867, with the contract awarded to begin construction on March 25, 1881. Due to financial and legal issues, construction kept starting and stopping. These negatives depict the construction that took place in 1895, which was later halted. The name of the bridge was given for the name of the the island, Blackwell's Island, siutated in the East River between Manhattan and Queens that the bridges mid-river supporting piers were built on. The island today is called Roosevelt Island.
Blackwells Island Bridge, Pier 5
Glass plate negative depicting scenes from the construction of Blackwell's Island Bridge in 1895, a cantilever bridge that connects Queens to Manhattan. The bridge, now called the Queensboro Bridge (its official name being the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge) was offically completed in 1909. However, the state charter to build the bridge was given on April 16, 1867, with the contract awarded to begin construction on March 25, 1881. Due to financial and legal issues, construction kept starting and stopping. These negatives depict the construction that took place in 1895, which was later halted. The name of the bridge was given for the name of the the island, Blackwell's Island, siutated in the East River between Manhattan and Queens that the bridges mid-river supporting piers were built on. The island today is called Roosevelt Island.
Blackwells Island Bridge, Pit of Pier 3
Glass plate negative depicting scenes from the construction of Blackwell's Island Bridge in 1895, a cantilever bridge that connects Queens to Manhattan. The bridge, now called the Queensboro Bridge (its official name being the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge) was offically completed in 1909. However, the state charter to build the bridge was given on April 16, 1867, with the contract awarded to begin construction on March 25, 1881. Due to financial and legal issues, construction kept starting and stopping. These negatives depict the construction that took place in 1895, which was later halted. The name of the bridge was given for the name of the the island, Blackwell's Island, siutated in the East River between Manhattan and Queens that the bridges mid-river supporting piers were built on. The island today is called Roosevelt Island.
Blaine and Logan Ribbon, 1884
Republican party campaign ribbon for the 1884 United States presidential election from the Coal and Iron Trade Association. James G. Blaine of Maine won the Republican party nomination and chose John A. Logan of Illinois as his vice-presidential nomination. Blaine was defeated in the general election by the Democratic nominee, Grover Cleveland. It was the first election of a Democat as President since 1856.
Blank Petition Sheet to Remove the Sixth Avenue Elevated Railroad
Printed petition sheet template addressed to the Board of Estimate and Apportionment, New York City. The petition argues for the removal of the Sixth Avenune Elevated line with those signing the petition current users of the line who assert they will use the Ninth Avenue Elevated Railroad as an alternative.
Blueprint Title Page "Photographs: The New York and Long Island Bridge"
Blueprint title page for scenes from the construction of Blackwell's Island Bridge in 1895, a cantilever bridge that connects Queens to Manhattan. The bridge, now called the Queensboro Bridge (its official name being the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge) was offically completed in 1909. However, the state charter to build the bridge was given on April 16, 1867, with the contract awarded to begin construction on March 25, 1881. Due to financial and legal issues, construction kept starting and stopping. These negatives depict the construction that took place in 1895, which was later halted. The name of the bridge was given for the name of the the island, Blackwell's Island, siutated in the East River between Manhattan and Queens that the bridges mid-river supporting piers were built on. The island today is called Roosevelt Island.
Blueprint of Blackwells Island Bridge Construction, Men Working
Blueprint depicting scenes from the construction of Blackwell's Island Bridge in 1895, a cantilever bridge that connects Queens to Manhattan. The bridge, now called the Queensboro Bridge (its official name being the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge) was offically completed in 1909. However, the state charter to build the bridge was given on April 16, 1867, with the contract awarded to begin construction on March 25, 1881. Due to financial and legal issues, construction kept starting and stopping. These negatives depict the construction that took place in 1895, which was later halted. The name of the bridge was given for the name of the the island, Blackwell's Island, siutated in the East River between Manhattan and Queens that the bridges mid-river supporting piers were built on. The island today is called Roosevelt Island.
Blueprint of Blackwells Island Bridge Construction, Train Tracks Next to Bridge
Blueprint depicting scenes from the construction of Blackwell's Island Bridge in 1895, a cantilever bridge that connects Queens to Manhattan. The bridge, now called the Queensboro Bridge (its official name being the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge) was offically completed in 1909. However, the state charter to build the bridge was given on April 16, 1867, with the contract awarded to begin construction on March 25, 1881. Due to financial and legal issues, construction kept starting and stopping. These negatives depict the construction that took place in 1895, which was later halted. The name of the bridge was given for the name of the the island, Blackwell's Island, siutated in the East River between Manhattan and Queens that the bridges mid-river supporting piers were built on. The island today is called Roosevelt Island.
Blueprint of Blackwells Island Bridge Model
Blueprint depicting scenes from the construction of Blackwell's Island Bridge in 1895, a cantilever bridge that connects Queens to Manhattan. The bridge, now called the Queensboro Bridge (its official name being the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge) was offically completed in 1909. However, the state charter to build the bridge was given on April 16, 1867, with the contract awarded to begin construction on March 25, 1881. Due to financial and legal issues, construction kept starting and stopping. These negatives depict the construction that took place in 1895, which was later halted. The name of the bridge was given for the name of the the island, Blackwell's Island, siutated in the East River between Manhattan and Queens that the bridges mid-river supporting piers were built on. The island today is called Roosevelt Island.
Blueprint of East Channel during Blackwells Island Bridge Construction
Blueprint depicting scenes from the construction of Blackwell's Island Bridge in 1895, a cantilever bridge that connects Queens to Manhattan. The bridge, now called the Queensboro Bridge (its official name being the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge) was offically completed in 1909. However, the state charter to build the bridge was given on April 16, 1867, with the contract awarded to begin construction on March 25, 1881. Due to financial and legal issues, construction kept starting and stopping. These negatives depict the construction that took place in 1895, which was later halted. The name of the bridge was given for the name of the the island, Blackwell's Island, siutated in the East River between Manhattan and Queens that the bridges mid-river supporting piers were built on. The island today is called Roosevelt Island.
Blueprint of Ground Pillars of Blackwells Island Bridge
Blueprint depicting scenes from the construction of Blackwell's Island Bridge in 1895, a cantilever bridge that connects Queens to Manhattan. The bridge, now called the Queensboro Bridge (its official name being the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge) was offically completed in 1909. However, the state charter to build the bridge was given on April 16, 1867, with the contract awarded to begin construction on March 25, 1881. Due to financial and legal issues, construction kept starting and stopping. These negatives depict the construction that took place in 1895, which was later halted. The name of the bridge was given for the name of the the island, Blackwell's Island, siutated in the East River between Manhattan and Queens that the bridges mid-river supporting piers were built on. The island today is called Roosevelt Island.
Bombardment Assault on Fort Mercer at Red Bank
Lantern slide depicting the assault on Fort Mercer which was part of the Battle of Red Bank fought on October 22, 1777 during the American Revolutionary War. The lantern slides were a gift of Mr. Frederic W. Thomas given to GSMT on May 25, 1928 and were used in a lecture on the American Revolution called 'One Flag. One Country, One People'. Slide number 41.
Boston Massacre
Lantern slide depicting the Boston Massacre that took place in March 1770. The massacre was seen as a key event in helping to galvinize the colonial public to the patriot cause. The lantern slides were a gift of Mr. Frederic W. Thomas given to GSMT on May 25, 1928 and were used in a lecture on the American Revolution called 'One Flag. One Country, One People'. Slide number 6.
Boston Tea Party
Lantern slide depicting The Boston Tea Party. The Boston Tea Party was a political protest against taxation by The Sons of Liberty on December 16, 1773. It was in defiance of The Tea Act of May 10, 1773 which adjusted import duties. Samuel Adams and the Sons of Liberty boarded three ships in the Boston harbor on the night of December 16 and threw 342 chests of tea overboard, which resulted in the passage of the punitive Coercive Acts in 1774 and pushed the United Kingdom & America closer to war. The lantern slides were a gift of Mr. Frederic W. Thomas given to GSMT on May 25, 1928 and were used in a lecture on the American Revolution called 'One Flag. One Country, One People'. Slide number 7.
British Evacuating New York
Lantern slide depicting the British evacuating New York City, which occurred on November 25, 1783. This date marked the end of British occupation in America and after their departure the City was secured by American troops under the command of General Knox. The lantern slides were a gift of Mr. Frederic W. Thomas given to GSMT on May 25, 1928 and were used in a lecture on the American Revolution called 'One Flag. One Country, One People'. Slide number 69.
Broadway Theatre Opening Night Bill
Playbill for Broadway Theatre opening night on September 27, 1847.
Brooklyn Bridge Opening Ceremony Invitation
Invitation to the opening ceremony of the Brooklyn Bridge that took place on May 24, 1883 at 2pm.
Bunker Hill
Lantern slide depicting the Battle of Bunker Hill which took place in June, 1775. It was a battle in the Revolutionary War (1775-83) in which the British defeated the Americans. The lantern slides were a gift of Mr. Frederic W. Thomas given to GSMT on May 25, 1928 and were used in a lecture on the American Revolution called 'One Flag. One Country, One People'.
Burial of General Fraser at Saratoga
Lantern slide depicting the burial of British General Simon Fraser who was killed in the Battle of Bemis Heights during the Saratoga Campaign by Timothy Murphy, an American rifleman on October 7, 1777. The lantern slides were a gift of Mr. Frederic W. Thomas given to GSMT on May 25, 1928 and were used in a lecture on the American Revolution called 'One Flag. One Country, One People'. Slide number 47.
Capture of Fort Ticonderoga
Lantern slide depicting the capture of Fort Ticonderoga by the Americans which took place on May 10, 1775 during the Revolutionary War. Col. Ethan Allen and Col. Benedict Arnold led the American troops. The lantern slides were a gift of Mr. Frederic W. Thomas given to GSMT on May 25, 1928 and were used in a lecture on the American Revolution called 'One Flag. One Country, One People'.
Capture of Major André
Lantern slide depicting the capture of Major John André that occurred near Tarrytown, New York after the meeting of Benedict Arnold and André. He was later executed. The lantern slides were a gift of Mr. Frederic W. Thomas given to GSMT on May 25, 1928 and were used in a lecture on the American Revolution called 'One Flag. One Country, One People'. Slide number 60.
Capture of Redoubt at Yorktown
Lantern slide depicting the capture of redoubts during the Battle of Yorktown, fought in October 1781 during the American Revolutionary War. It was a combined French and American effort that defeated the British and was the last major battle of the war. The lantern slides were a gift of Mr. Frederic W. Thomas given to GSMT on May 25, 1928 and were used in a lecture on the American Revolution called 'One Flag. One Country, One People'. Slide number 66.
Capture of Stony Point
Lantern slide depicting the Battle of Stony Point, fought on July 16, 1779 during the American Revolutionary War. The lantern slides were a gift of Mr. Frederic W. Thomas given to GSMT on May 25, 1928 and were used in a lecture on the American Revolution called 'One Flag. One Country, One People'. Slide number 52.
Carlson-Holohan Industry Award
Since 2006, the Carlson-Holohan Industry Award is presented bi-annually, in recognition of an individual known for dedication to teaching, mentoring and fundraising for philanthropic causes on behalf of the steam and hydronic industry. This honor, bestowed upon an American or Canadian citizen, is based upon the character traits of Gil Carlson, a highly distinguished mechanical engineer considered by many as the "Father of Modern Hydronics," who was the 1963 inventor of the Bell & Gossett System Syzer nomograph, and his protégé Dan Holohan, author, educator, humanitarian and General Society member.
Celebration of Declaration of Independence
Lantern slide depicting a crowd celebrating the signing of the Declaration of Independence, signed on July 4, 1776. The lantern slides were a gift of Mr. Frederic W. Thomas given to GSMT on May 25, 1928 and were used in a lecture on the American Revolution called 'One Flag. One Country, One People'. Slide number 25.
Centennial GSMT Ribbon
Centennial celebration ribbon for GSMT dated November, 1885.
Chautauqua Literary and Scientific Circle Student Card, 1882
Membership card for the Chautauqua Literary and Scientific Circle; the oldest, continuous book club/home reading course in America. It was founded in 1878 by Bishop John Heyl Vincent and has graduated a class from the four-year reading course every year since 1882. It is run by the Chautauqua Institution.
Clear The Way! Buy Bonds WW1 Poster
A World War One propaganda poster with a woman symbolizing America above a naval crew engaged in operation. The poster was part of the drive to encourage the American public to invest in liberty bonds.
Coal Sound Money Club Ribbon, 1900
Commemorative ribbon for the Sound Money Club dated 1900. Sound money was defined as a stable money not liable to sudden appreciation or depreciation in value.

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