CUNY Graduate Center Collection, Murray Hill

This digital collection is made up of 280 images depicting the Murray Hill Neighborhood in Manhattan. It includes historical photographs as well as newly commissioned ones that show how the neighborhood has changed over time.

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102-112 East 35th Street
102-112 East 35th Street. Built in 1853-1855. Significant renovations have taken place on all of the rowhouses. Including a mansard roof added to 102 by the firm of McKim, Mead & White in 1892, sash alterations added to the windows on 106 and 108 carried out by architects Renwick, Aspinwall and Russell in 1888, and rear extensions added to Nos. 104-112.
102-112 East 35th Street, 2008.
102-112 East 35th Street. Built in 1853-1855. Significant renovations have taken place on all of the rowhouses. Including a mansard roof added to 102 by the firm of McKim, Mead & White in 1892, sash alterations added to the windows on 106 and 108 carried out by architects Renwick, Aspinwall and Russell in 1888, and rear extensions added to Nos. 104-112.
105-111 East 35th Street, 1977.
105-111 East 35th Street. Damaged photograph has a hole on the lower left side. 105 E. 35th St. much altered, with an added mansard roof, first-story rustication, and the installation of statuary on the facade.
105-111 East 35th Street, 2008.
105-111 East 35th Street. 105 E. 35th St. is much altered from its original state, with an added mansard roof, first-story rustication, and the installation of statuary on the facade.
113-115 East 35th Street
Photograph of windows and door fronts of 113-115 E. 35th St. Photograph is damaged and has a large hole in its center left. Nos. 113 and 115 are identical brownstones with a unified facade.
113-115 East 35th Street, 2008.
Photograph of windows and door fronts of 113-115 E. 35th St. Nos. 113 and 115 are identical brownstones with a unified facade.
116-122 East 36th Street, 1976.
116-122 East 36th Street. This photo marked "1976". Apartment house, 116-122 E. 36th St.; Built: 1955; Architect: Greenberg & Ames.
116-122 East 36th Street, 2008.
116-122 East 36th Street. Apartment house, 116-122 E. 36th St.; Built: 1955; Architect: Greenberg & Ames.
118-124 East 36th Street, 1937.
118-124 East 36th Street. No. 120 - Former residence of Col. Henry L. Stimson, Secretary of State in President Hoover's Cabinet. 1937. Group of 4 row houses, 116-122 E. 36th Street; Built: c. 1858; Razed: 1955; Architect: George J. Hamilton. 124 E. 36th Street; Built: 1863. A four-story addition built onto the back of the house: 1885; Architect: John H. Duncan.
119-121 E. 35th Street, 2008.
119-121 E. 35th Street. Pair of brownstones built 1855-1856 by developer George Lindford ; they originally shared a single cornice. The original iron fence remains. These homes are very similar to the pair of brownstones at No. 113-115. In the early 1950's, writer and editor Frederick Lewis Allen lived in No. 121.
119-121 E. 35th Street.
Unlabeled image of 119-121 E. 35th Street. Pair of brownstones built 1855-1856 by developer George Lindford ; they originally shared a single cornice. The original iron fence remains. These homes are very similar to the pair of brownstones at No. 113-115. In the early 1950's, writer and editor Frederick Lewis Allen lived in No. 121.
123 East 35th Street, 1916.
123 East 35th Street. Originally the James F. D. Lanier House. Originally the James F. D. Lanier House. Built 1901-1903 ; Architect: Hoppin & Koen. The 33 foot wide, 3 bay home replaced two earlier brownstone rowhouses. The Beaux Arts mansion was built by James F. D. Lanier, a banker, and his wife, Harriet Bishop Lanier.
123 East 35th Street, 1976.
123 East 35th Street. This photo marked "1976". Originally the James F. D. Lanier House. Built 1901-1903 ; Architect: Hoppin & Koen. The 33 foot wide, 3 bay home replaced two earlier brownstone rowhouses. The Beaux Arts mansion was built by James F. D. Lanier, a banker, and his wife, Harriet Bishop Lanier.
123 East 35th Street, 2008.
123 East 35th Street. Originally the James F. D. Lanier House. Built 1901-1903 ; Architect: Hoppin & Koen. The 33 foot wide, 3 bay home replaced two earlier brownstone rowhouses. The Beaux Arts mansion was built by James F. D. Lanier, a banker, and his wife, Harriet Bishop Lanier.
126-130 East 35th Street, 1977.
126-130 East 35th Street, 1977. Built in 1854 but considerably altered from original design. Owners removed the stoops in favor of basement entrances and changed the top floors and rooflines so that they are no longer uniform. No. 126 was altered in 1941 by architect Stephen L. Heinrich who converted it from a single to multiple-family dwelling. No. 128 was converted to a multiple-family dwelling in 1934 by architect Harry M. Clawson.
126-130 East 35th Street, 2008.
126-130 East 35th Street, 2008. Built in 1854 but considerably altered from original design. Owners removed the stoops in favor of basement entrances and changed the top floors and rooflines so that they are no longer uniform. No. 126 was altered in 1941 by architect Stephen L. Heinrich who converted it from a single to multiple-family dwelling. No. 128 was converted to a multiple-family dwelling in 1934 by architect Harry M. Clawson.
127 East 35th Street, 1977.
127 East 35th Street. The entrances to Nos. 123 and 129 partially visible on either side. Built in 1853-1854. Originally one of a group of three row houses, the other two (Nos. 123 and 125) were torn down in 1901-1903 to make way for the Lanier mansion. In 1913, owner Eustace Conway added a two story Tudor-style oriel. Architects: York & Sawyer.
127 East 35th Street, 2008.
127 East 35th Street. The entrances to Nos. 123 and 129 partially visible on either side. Built in 1853-1854. Originally one of a group of three row houses, the other two (Nos. 123 and 125) were torn down in 1901-1903 to make way for the Lanier mansion. In 1913, owner Eustace Conway added a two story Tudor-style oriel. Architects: York & Sawyer.
129-137 E. 35th St., 1977.
Row house facades, 129-137 E. 35th Street. Twenty foot wide rowhouses. Their original unified facade was spoiled by the removal of stoops in favor of basement entrances at No. 131 and 135. All five row houses have original cornices featuring architectural details such as dentils, friezes, and modillions.
15 East 36th Street, 1892.
First terra-cotta building erected in New York City, 15 East 36th Street, 1892. Henry M. Braem house. Built: 1877. Architect: George B. Post.
15 East 36th Street, 2008.
Apartment house, 15 East 36th Street. Built on the site of the Henry M. Braem home.
152-162 East 37th Street, 1976.
152-162 East 37th Street. 162 and 156 E. 37th St. built 1924. 154 E. 37th St. built 1910.
152-162 East 37th Street, 2008.
152-162 East 37th Street, 2008. 162 and 156 E. 37th St. built 1924. 154 E. 37th St. built 1910.
152-162 East 37th Street.
152-162 East 37th Street. 162 and 156 E. 37th St. built 1924. 154 E. 37th St. built 1910.
23 Park Avenue
23 Park Avenue; 101-103 East 35th Street. Originally built in 1898 for J. Hampden and Cornelia Van Rensselaer Robb. Architect: Stanford White of McKim, Mead & White. Acquired by the Advertising Club of New York in 1923. The group had the building remodeled by architect Fred F. French, and the club opened in 1924. During repairs following a 1946 fire, the building was expanded to include an adjacent home at 103 E. 35th St. The building is now an apartment house.
23 Park Avenue, 1977.
23 Park Avenue; NE corner of Park Avenue and E. 35th St. Also known as: 101-103 E. 35th St. Originally built in 1898 for J. Hampden and Cornelia Van Rensselaer Robb. Architect: Stanford White of McKim, Mead & White. Acquired by the Advertising Club of New York in 1923. The group had the building remodeled by architect Fred F. French, and the club opened in 1924. During repairs following a 1946 fire, the building was expanded to include an adjacent home at 103 E. 35th St. The building is now an apartment house.
23 Park Avenue, June 2008.
23 Park Avenue; NE corner of Park Avenue and E. 35th St. Also known as: 101-103 E. 35th St. Building under scaffolding at time of photograph. Originally built in 1898 for J. Hampden and Cornelia Van Rensselaer Robb. Architect: Stanford White of McKim, Mead & White. Acquired by the Advertising Club of New York in 1923. The group had the building remodeled by architect Fred F. French, and the club opened in 1924. During repairs following a 1946 fire, the building was expanded to include an adjacent home at 103 E. 35th St. The building is now an apartment house.
23 Park Avenue, November 2008.
23 Park Avenue; NE corner of Park Avenue and E. 35th St. Also known as: 101-103 E. 35th St. Originally built in 1898 for J. Hampden and Cornelia Van Rensselaer Robb. Architect: Stanford White of McKim, Mead & White. Acquired by the Advertising Club of New York in 1923. The group had the building remodeled by architect Fred F. French, and the club opened in 1924. During repairs following a 1946 fire, the building was expanded to include an adjacent home at 103 E. 35th St. The building is now an apartment house.
26 East 36th Street, 1920.
26 East 36th Street, 1920.
26 East 36th Street, 1976.
26 East 36th Street. This photo marked "1976".
26 East 36th Street, 2008.
26 East 36th Street.
29 East 35th Street, 2008.
29 East 35th Street.
310 East 37th Street, 1976.
Sign reads: Queens Midtown Tunnel. This site was previously home to St. Gabriel's Church, demolished 1939. Photo marked "1976."
310 East 37th Street, 2008.
Sign reads: Queens Midtown Tunnel. This site was previously home to St. Gabriel's Church, demolished 1939. Photo marked "1976."
34th Street looking east from Fifth Avenue, 1880.
Fifth Avenue and East 34th Street. The north side of the street is the eventual site of the B. Altman department store (now the CUNY Graduate Center).
34th Street looking east from Fifth Avenue, 2008.
34th Street looking east from Fifth Avenue, 2008. On the north side of the street sits the CUNY Graduate Center, formerly the B. Altman building.
34th Street looking toward East River, 1936.
East 34th Street and First Avenue. Abandoned L.I.R.R. Ferry Terminus with derelict 'Mount Hood' in the slip
34th Street looking toward East River, 1976.
East 34th Street and First Avenue.
34th Street looking toward East River, 2008.
34th Street and First Avenue, looking toward East River, 2008.
34th Street looking west from Second Avenue, 1931.
East 34th Street and Second Avenue. Elevated train structure running from Third Avenue to the East River. This branch was the first to use electricity experimentation prior to electrifying the lines.
34th Street looking west from Second Avenue, 1976.
East 34th Street and Second Avenue. This photo marked "1976". Some discoloration in center of photograph.
34th Street looking west from Second Avenue, 2008.
East 34th Street and Second Avenue.
35th Street and Fifth Avenue, 1899.
Fifth Avenue and West 35th Street. Waldorf-Astoria, Stewart Mansion, Art Gallery of Samuel P. Avery, and the Caswell Mansion at corner of 35th Street and Fifth Avenue, 1899. Caption reads: The H. N. Tiemann Co. ; New York City. Waldorf Hotel built 1893; Astoria Hotel built 1897; Architect for both buildings: Henry James Hardenbergh. The Waldorf-Astoria was razed in 1929 to make way for the Empire State Building. The A.T. Stewart Mansion, built: 1896; razed: 1902-1904; architect: James Kellum. The Stewart Mansion was home to the Manhattan Club, 1890-1899. The John Caswell Mansion, built: 1859. The Caswell Mansion was leased to the University Club in 1879 and the New York Club in 1887.
36th Street looking west from First Avenue, 1939.
First Avenue and East 36th Street. Hand written caption reads: W. on S/S of E. 36th St. from 1st Ave. ; 1-8-39 ; Somach 399.
36th Street looking west from First Avenue, 2008.
First Avenue and East 36th Street.
37th Street near Park Avenue
Homes on 37th Street near Park Avenue. Exact location and date unknown.
38th Street between First and Second Avenues, 2008.
East 38th Street and 2nd Avenue.
39th Street, 1976
39th Street and Lexington Ave. Unlabeled street scene. Photo marked "1976". Small tears in center of photograph.
42nd Street between Second and Third Avenues, 2008.
East 42nd Street and Second Ave. Once the site of a sprawling 19th century shantytown, this stretch of 42nd Street now houses Pfizer's world headquarters.
50 Park Avenue, 1976.
Park Avenue at 37th Street, northwest corner. Formerly the site of the Charles Coster Home, now 50 Park Avenue. Photo marked "1976".

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