CUNY Graduate Center Collection, Murray Hill

This digital collection is made up of 280 images depicting the Murray Hill Neighborhood in Manhattan. It includes historical photographs as well as newly commissioned ones that show how the neighborhood has changed over time.

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57 Park Avenue, 1976.
57 Park Avenue South, 1976. Park Avenue and East 37th St. Handwritten caption marks the location of the Olympic House and Old Park area.57 Park Avenue, Built: 1911; Architect: Horace Trumbauer. The original owner was Adelaide E. Douglas. The building is now home to the Guatemalan Mission to the United States.
71st Regiment Armory, 1906.
71st Regiment Armory in 1906, Park Avenue and East 34th Street. Caption reads: Armory of the Seventy-First Regiment, N. G. N. Y., Park Avenue, New York, N.Y. ; Clinton & Russell, Architects. The 71st Regiment Armory; Built: 1892-1894, Architect: John R. Russell; Rebuilt: 1904, Architects: Clinton and Russell; Razed: 1970's. The original Romanesque Revival building burned down in 1902 and was replaced in 1904 by a red brick structure in the style of a medieval castle. The 250 foot tower was modeled after the Palazzo Pubblico of Siena, Italy.
71st Regiment Armory, turn of the century.
Park Avenue and East 34th Street. Drawing of the 71st Regiment Armory, Park Avenue and 34th Street, southeast corner. The 71st Regiment Armory; Built: 1892-1894, Architect: John R. Thomas ; Rebuilt: 1904, Architects: Clinton and Russell; Razed: 1970's. The original Romanesque Revival building burned down in 1902 and was replaced in 1904 by a red brick structure in the style of a medieval castle.
A. T. Stewart Mansion, 1869.
Fifth Avenue and West 34th Street. Stewart Mansion housed the Manhattan Club from 1890-1899. This block is now the site of the Empire State Building. A 3 story Second Empire-style mansion with an additional 2 floors housed within the mansarded roof. Built: 1869; Razed: 1902-1904; Architect: John Kellum. Image caption reads: Mr. A.T. Stewart's new residence, corner of Fifth Avenue and Thirty-fourth Street, New York City.
Architects Building, 1913. 101 Park Avenue South.
Drawing of the Architects Building, northeast corner of Park Avenue and 40th Street, 1913. Grand Central Terminal at the left. The Architects Building; Built: 1912. Razed: 1979. Architects: Ewing & Chappell and La Farge & Morris. Located at 101 Park Avenue, The Architects Building housed the offices of the city's architectural elite including Kenneth Murchison, Arnold Brunner, and the firm of McKim, Meade & White. The 16 story building was demolished to make way for a 49 story office tower.
Architectural model, Morgan Library atrium, 225 Madison Avenue, 2009
Architectural model, Morgan Library atrium, 2009. Central atrium of the Morgan Library. Built: 2006. Architect: Renzo Piano. The atrium was added as part of an expansion project which integrated the three existing buildings on the Morgan's campus and added additional exhibition space. The exterior marble wall of the original McKim, Mead & White library building appears on the left. The vitrine contains a scale model of Charles McKim's landmarked Italian Renaissance-inspired building.
B. Altman Building, 365 Fifth Avenue, 1924.
Fifth Avenue looking north from 34th Street, 1924. B. Altman in foreground. There are holes on the upper-right corner and throughout the left side of the image. The B. Altman & Company department store. Built: 1905-1906; Extended: 1913; Architects: Trowbridge & Livingstone. The store originally fronted on 5th Avenue and by 1911 stretched the full block from 34th to 35th Streets. In 1913 a final expansion extended the back of the building to Madison Avenue. The Renaissance Revival building now houses the CUNY Graduate Center (5th Avenue entrance) and the NYPL science and business library (Madison Avenue entrance).
Bay windows, 127 East 35th Street.
Bay windows, 127 East 35th Street. Built in 1853-1854. Originally one of a group of three row houses, the other two (Nos. 123 and 125) were torn down in 1901-1903 to make way for the Lanier mansion. In 1913, owner Eustace Conway added a two story Tudor-style oriel. Architects: York & Sawyer.
Block of dwelling houses, 1858.
Fifth Avenue and East 42nd Street. Block of dwelling houses, east side from 42nd Street, 1858. Advertisement for houses on 5th Avenue across from the Croton Reservoir. Caption reads in part: Designed by Alex'r J. Davis, Architect, and erected by Geo. Higgins, Esq.
CUNY Graduate Center, 365 Fifth Avenue, 2008.
Fifth Avenue looking north from 34th Street, 2008. CUNY Graduate Center. Originally the B. Altman & Company department store. Built: 1905-1906; Extended: 1913; Architects: Trowbridge & Livingstone. The store originally fronted on 5th Avenue and by 1911 stretched the full block from 34th to 35th Streets. In 1913 a final expansion extended the back of the building to Madison Avenue. The Renaissance Revival building now houses the CUNY Graduate Center (5th Avenue entrance) and the NYPL science and business library (Madison Avenue entrance).
Cafe, Morgan Library atrium, 225 Madison Avenue, 2009
Interior, Morgan Library atrium, 2009. Central atrium of the Morgan Library. Built: 2006. Architect: Renzo Piano. The atrium was added as part of an expansion project which integrated the three existing buildings on the Morgan's campus and added additional exhibition space. The Morgan's visitor cafe lies in the rear of the glass-enclosed atrium.
Caroline Astor Residence, 1893.
View south down Fifth Avenue from intersection with 34th Street. Northwest corner (foreground): residence of Caroline Astor at 350 Fifth Ave. Future site of the Astoria Hotel erected in 1897. Southwest corner (background): Waldorf Hotel; built in 1893 on the former site of William Astor's home.Fifth Avenue and West 34th Street. The Waldorf Hotel combined with the Astoria in 1897. The hotel was moved uptown and the site was razed in 1929 to make way for the Empire State Building.
Carriage House, 149 East 38th Street, 1939.
Carriage House, 149 East 38th Street, 1939. Modelled after Dutch townhouse. Originally the George S. Bowdoin Stable. Architect: Ralph S. Townsend. Built by William R. H. Martin in 1902. Purchased by George S. Bowdoin in 1907. The building served as a stable until 1918 when it was converted to a garage. The inset panels of horse heads in the decorative scheme refer to the building's original function.
Carriage House, 149 East 38th Street, 1976
Carriage House, 149 East 38th Street, 1976. Modelled after Dutch townhouse. Photo marked 1976. Originally the George S. Bowdoin Stable. Architect: Ralph S. Townsend. Built by William R. H. Martin in 1902. Purchased by George S. Bowdoin in 1907. Originally used as a stable, it was converted to a garage in 1918. The inset panels of horse heads in the decorative scheme refer to the building's original function.
Carriage House, 149 East 38th Street, 2008.
Carriage House, 149 East 38th Street, 2008. Modelled after Dutch townhouse. Originally the George S. Bowdoin Stable. Architect: Ralph S. Townsend. Built by William R. H. Martin in 1902. Purchased by George S. Bowdoin in 1907. The building served as a stable until 1918 when it was converted to a garage. The inset panels of horse heads in the decorative scheme refer to the building's original function.
Charles Coster House, Park Avenue and 37th Street
Charles Coster Home, Park Avenue at 37th Street, northwest corner, 1931. Now 50 Park Avenue.
Chrysler Building, 405 Lexington Avenue, 2008.
Upper stories of the Chrysler Building, Lexington Avenue and 42nd Street, 2008. Chrysler Building; Built: 1930; Architect: William Van Alen. Real estate developer William H. Reynolds began planning an office building on Lexington Ave. and 42nd Street with Van Alen as architect in 1927. Walter Chrysler took over the lease on the property in 1928. Chrysler continued working with Van Alen, who altered his original plans for an office tower to create an Art Deco skyscraper which was for two years the tallest building in the world. In accordance with zoning laws, the tower rose in a series of setbacks, each with its own decorative motif. The famous series of arches set with triangular windows which form the building's dome begin after the setback on the 59th floor and are topped with a 185-foot spire.
Church of St. John the Baptist, Lexington Avenue and East 35th Street, 1900.
Church of St. John the Baptist, 1900. Northeast corner of Lexington Avenue and 35th Street. Demolished 1939. Church St. John the Baptist. Built: 1856; Razed: 1939; Architects: Dudley & Condit. In 1893 the Church of the Epiphany merged with and moved into the Church of St. John the Baptist, located at 263 Lexington Avenue.
Church of the Covenant, Park Avenue and East 35th Street, 1890.
Church of the Covenant, 1890, Park Avenue and 35th Street, northwest corner. The Church of the Covenant; Built: 1863-1865; Razed: 1895; Architect: James Renwick, Jr. The Presbyterian church showcased a variety of architectural influences, including Richardsonian Romanesque and Byzantine styles. The belfry of the nearby Church of the Incarnation is visible in the background.
Church of the Holy Trinity, 1890.
Church of the Holy Trinity, East 42nd Street and Madison Avenue, looking east from Fifth Avenue toward Grand Central Depot, 1890. Written on the photo negative: "Dr. Tyng's Church". The Episcopal Church of the Holy Trinity; Built: 1874 ; Razed: Date unknown ; Architect: Leopold Eidlitz. The church was built by a parish founded in 1864 by Stephen H. Tyng. In 1895 the church merged with St. James Church and the building was sold.
Church of the Incarnation, Madison Ave. and East 35th Street, 1976.
Madison Avenue looking north from 35th Street. Photo marked "1976". Church of the Incarnation visible on N.E. corner of E. 35th Street; built 1864. Architect: Emelen T. Little. Restored in 1882 following fire damage. Architect: David Jardine.
Church of the Incarnation, Madison Ave. and East 35th Street, 1994.
Madison Avenue looking north from 35th Street, 1994. Photo badly faded. Church of the Incarnation visible on N.E. corner of E. 35th Street; built: 1864; Architect: Emelen T. Little. Restored in 1882 following fire damage. Architect: David Jardine.
Church of the Incarnation, Madison Ave. and East 35th Street, 2008
Madison Avenue looking north from 35th Street. Church of the Incarnation visible on N.E. corner of E. 35th Street; built 1864. Architect: Emelen T. Little. Restored in 1882 following fire damage. Architect: David Jardine.
Church of the Messiah.
The Church of the Messiah, Park Avenue and East 34th Street. Dedicated 1868. Railroad extends north to 42nd Street, 1890. The residence on the left is the site of the Vanderbilt Hotel. Passenger visible boarding a Central Park train with the destination "Harlem via Madison Av."
Construction site across from Grand Central Terminal.
Construction site across from Grand Central, 87 East 42nd Street. Grand Central Terminal built 1903-1913. Architects: Reed & Stem, Warren & Wetmore. Restoration: 1998. The Beaux Arts railroad station was built on the same site as its predecessor, Grand Central Depot. The clock and structural group which top the main 42nd Street façade are by sculptor Jules Félix Coutan.
Corner of 35th Street and Fifth Avenue, 1976.
Fifth Avenue and West 35th Street, 1976, looking south. Image badly discolored. Southwest corner of Fifth Avenue and 35th Street. In the foreground is the Acker, Merral & Condit Building. Built by Boehm & Coon : 1908; Architect: Clinton & Russell. Formerly the site of the New York Club.
Corner of 35th Street and Fifth Avenue, 2008.
Fifth Avenue and West 35th Street, 2008, looking south. Southwest corner of Fifth Avenue and 35th Street. In the foreground is the Acker, Merral & Condit Building. Built by Boehm & Coon : 1908; Architect: Clinton & Russell. Formerly the site of the New York Club.
Corridor, Morgan Library, 2009
Corridor, Morgan Library, 2009. 29 East 36th Street. Following J.P. Morgan's death his home on the corner of Madison Avenue and E. 36th Street was razed and an addition to his library built on the site. Though the two buildings appeared to be separate they connected through a back corridor. Built: 1928; Architect: Benjamin W. Morris. Morris's Italian Renaissance-inspired building complements the classicism of the Morgan Library's original 1906 building. This corridor is a showcase of Neo-Italian Renaissance design. The floors are inlaid with marble
Croton Cottage, Fifth Avenue at 40th Street, 1865.
Drawing of Croton Cottage, Fifth Avenue and East 40th Street - southeast corner, 1865. The cottage sat across 5th Ave. from the Croton Reservoir. Caption reads: The Major & Knapp, Eng. Mf'g & Lith. Co. 449 Broadway, N.Y. ; For D.T. Valentine's Manual 1865 ; Old country inn (Croton Cottage) Cor. 5th Av. & 40th St.
DeLamar Mansion, 233 Madison Avenue, 1976.
Delamar Mansion. View looking north on Madison Avenue from 36th Street. Photo marked "1976". Originally Joseph R. DeLamar House. Built 1902 ; Architect: C.P.H. Gilbert. The Beaux Arts mansion was sold to the National Democratic Club in 1923. Bought by the Polish People's Republic, 1973. Now the Consulate General of Poland.
DeLamar Mansion, 233 Madison Avenue, 2008.
Delamar Mansion. View looking north on Madison Avenue from 36th Street. Originally Joseph R. DeLamar House. Built 1902 ; Architect: C.P.H. Gilbert. The Beaux Arts mansion was sold to the National Democratic Club in 1923. Bought by the Polish People's Republic, 1973. Now the Consulate General of Poland.
Detail of 23 Park Avenue, 1977.
Detail of windows on side of 23 Park Avenue. Originally built in 1898 for J. Hampden and Cornelia Van Rensselaer Robb. Architect: Stanford White of McKim, Mead & White. Acquired by the Advertising Club of New York in 1923. The group had the building remodeled by architect Fred F. French, and the club opened in 1924. During repairs following a 1946 fire, the building was expanded to include an adjacent home at 103 E. 35th St. The building is now an apartment house.
Detail of windows, 106 East 35th Street, 2008
Detail of upper story windows and roofline at 106 East 35th Street. Built in 1853-1854 ; sash alterations to the windows on 106 and 108 carried out by architects Renwick, Aspinwall and Russell in 1888.
Detail of windows, 106 East 35th Street.
Detail of upper story windows and roofline at 106 East 35th Street. Built in 1853-1854 ; sash alterations to the windows on 106 and 108 carried out by architects Renwick, Aspinwall and Russell in 1888.
Detail, Ratzer Map, 1766.
Detail from Ratzer Map, 1766, showing Inclenberg and Robert Murray's farm.
Detail, bay windows, 127 East 35th Street.
Bay windows, 127 East 35th Street. Built in 1853-1854. Originally one of a group of three row houses, the other two (Nos. 123 and 125) were torn down in 1901-1903 to make way for the Lanier mansion. In 1913, owner Eustace Conway added a two story Tudor-style oriel. Architects: York & Sawyer.
Doorway, 129 E. 35th Street, 2008.
129 E. 35th Street. Photographed behind scaffolding. Built 1859-1860 by granite dealer Thomas Crane and stone cutter Alexander McDonald. The two men developed plans for Nos. 129-137 E. 35th Street and then transferred titles to investors during the building process. This second phase of development in Murray Hill's historic district reflected the wealth of middle class families in the years before the Civil War. Much of the original rich architectural detail survives, including the stoop and railings, the surround and hood over the main entryway, and the building's cornice.
Doorway, 129 E. 35th Street.
129 East 35th Street. Built 1859-1860 by granite dealer Thomas Crane and stone cutter Alexander McDonald. The two men developed plans for Nos. 129-137 E. 35th Street and then transferred titles to investors during the building process. This second phase of development in Murray Hill's historic district reflected the wealth of middle class families in the years before the Civil War. Much of the original rich architectural detail survives, including the stoop and railings, the surround and hood over the main entryway, and the building's cornice.
Dr. Townsend's Residence.
Fifth Avenue and West 34th Street. Dr. Townsend's Residence. Built: 1853-1855. Razed: 1864. Northwest corner of Fifth Avenue and 34th Street.Originally built by Samuel P. Townsend, the patentee of sarsaparilla. The house was sold to Dr. G. Abbott in 1862 who conducted seminary for young ladies. The Townsend home was eventually replaced by the A.T. Stewart Mansion which was then razed to make way for the Empire State Building.
Drawing of the John D. Wendel Home.
Fifth Avenue and West 39th Street. Drawing of the John D. Wendel Home, Fifth Avenue and 39th Street - northwest corner. Wendel home built: 1856; razed: 1934. The house remained in the Wendel family for 3 generations. When the final heir died in 1931 she left the house to Drew University. The school leased the site to the S.H. Kress store chain which built its flagship on the site in 1935.
East 36th Street looking north from First Avenue, 1976.
First Avenue and East 36th Street. Photo marked "1976". Originally home to St. Gabriel's Park. Much of the park's land was ceded for the construction of the Queens Midtown Tunnel in 1938. Site renamed St. Vartan Park in 1978. The Queens Midtown Tunnel was built 1936-1940. Engineer and designer: Ole Singstad.
East 36th Street looking north from First Avenue, 2008.
East 36th Street looking north from First Avenue. Originally home to St. Gabriel's Park. Much of the park's land was ceded for the construction of the Queens Midtown Tunnel in 1938. Site renamed St. Vartan Park in 1978. The Queens Midtown Tunnel was built 1936-1940. Engineer and designer: Ole Singstad.
East 36th Street, 1976.
East 36th Street and Park Ave. View down 36th Street looking towards Madison Avenue. Photo marked "1976." Brick apartment building (foreground) and the McKim, Meade & White building of the Morgan Library complex (center).
East 39th Street, 1919.
From caption: #140 East 39th St. ; 1919.
East side of Fifth Avenue from 42nd Street, 1976.
View looking down the east side of Fifth Avenue from 42nd Street. Photo marked "1976".
Elevator, Morgan Library atrium, 2009
Interior, Morgan Library atrium, 225 Madison Avenue, 2009. Central atrium of the Morgan Library. Built: 2006. Architect: Renzo Piano. The atrium was added as part of an expansion project which integrated the three existing buildings on the Morgan's campus and added additional exhibition space. The glass elevator, visible on the right, connects the lobby with a gallery on the second floor and public event spaces on the lower level.
Empire State Building, 350 Fifth Avenue, 1976.
Empire State Building, Fifth Avenue and 34th Street - southwest corner. Photo marked "1976." Empire State Building built: 1929-1931. Architects: Shreve, Lamb & Harmon. Chief designer: William Lamb. The 1,250 foot tall skyscraper has a massive 5 story base topped by a soaring tower and capped by a metal mast. Added together from the basement to the top of the mast is 102 stories.
Empire State Building, 350 Fifth Avenue, 2008.
Empire State Building, Fifth Avenue and 34th Street - southwest corner. Empire State Building built: 1929-1931. Architects: Shreve, Lamb & Harmon. Chief designer: William Lamb. The 1,250 foot tall skyscraper has a massive 5 story base topped by a soaring tower and capped by a metal mast. Added together from the basement to the top of the mast is 102 stories.
Entrance to the McKim, Mead & White building, Morgan Library atrium, 225 Madison Avenue, 2009
Interior, Morgan Library atrium, 2009. View of the visitor entrance to the original McKim, Mead & White library building from the glass-enclosed central courtyard. Central atrium of the Morgan Library. Built: 2006. Architect: Renzo Piano. The atrium was added as part of an expansion project which integrated the three existing buildings on the Morgan's campus and added additional exhibition space. Pictured is the visitor entrance to the original McKim, Mead & White building. Rather than using the library's formal entrance which faces onto E. 36th Street, museum visitors walk through a secondary entrance which connects Renzo Piano's central atrium to an area at the rear of Charles McKim's original 1906 Italian Renaissance-inspired library building.
Entrance, 123 East 35th Street, 1977.
Entrance, 123 E. 35th Street. Photograph damaged; hole in the center. Originally the James F. D. Lanier House. Built 1901-1903 ; Architect: Hoppin & Koen. The 33 foot wide, 3 bay home replaced two earlier brownstone rowhouses. The Beaux Arts mansion was built by James F. D. Lanier, a banker, and his wife, Harriet Bishop Lanier.

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