CUNY Graduate Center Collection, Murray Hill

This digital collection is made up of 280 images depicting the Murray Hill Neighborhood in Manhattan. It includes historical photographs as well as newly commissioned ones that show how the neighborhood has changed over time.

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Keyser Estate,Park Avenue and East 40th Street, 1865
Keyser Estate, Park Avenue and 40th Street, from D.T. Valentine's Manual, 1865. Caption reads: The Major & Knapp, Eng. Mf'g & Lith. Co. 449 Broadway, N.Y. ; For D.T. Valentine's Manual 1865; The Keyser Estate. Cor. 4th (Park) Av. & 40th St.
Kip's Mansion, Second Avenue and East 35th Street
Kip Mansion. Once stood on Second Avenue and what is now the intersection of 35th Street. Built by the family of Jacobus Kip: 1696. Drawing accompanied by explanatory text. Image Lex321I attached.
Knickerbocker Trust Company, Fifth Avenue and West 34th Street, 1910
Knickerbocker Trust Company - succeeded the Stewart Mansion at Fifth Avenue and 34th Street, 1910. Northwest corner of 5th Avenue and 34th Street. Knickerbocker Trust Building, Built: 1902-1904; Architect: Stanford White of McKim, Mead & White. Although his design was never realized, White's plan for the 4 story building allowed for the addition of a 9 story office building above. The neo-classical bank had a narrow frontage on 5th Avenue notable for its heavy cornice supported by 4 massive columns.
Lexington Avenue and 38th Street, 1924.
Lexington Avenue and East 38th Street. Lexington Avenue, west side looking south between 38th and 37th Streets, 1924. Demolished 1940, replaced by Lindley House.
Lexington Avenue and 38th Street, 1976.
Lexington Avenue and East 38th Street. Lexington Avenue, west side looking south between 38th and 37th Streets, 1976. Photograph damaged; unevenly trimmed along top edge. Lindley House. Built: 1940. Architect: H. I. Feldman. Fifteen floor apartment building containing 94 residential units.
Lexington Avenue and 38th Street, 2008.
Lexington Avenue, west side looking south between 38th and 37th Streets, 2008. Lindley House. Built: 1940. Architect: H. I. Feldman. Fifteen floor apartment building containing 94 residential units.
Lexington Avenue near 37th Street, 1976.
Lexington Avenue and East 37th Street. Photo marked "1976". Condition: Image is very dark, ripped along bottom.
Lexington Avenue near 37th Street, 2008.
Lexington Avenue and East 37th Street.
Lexington Avenue, looking south from 41st Street, 1924.
Lexington Avenue and East 41st Street.
Lexington Avenue, looking south from 41st Street, 2008.
Lexington Avenue and East 41st Street, 2008.
Librarian's office, Morgan Library, 2009
Librarian's office, Morgan Library, 33 East 36th Street, 2009. One of a suite of three rooms in the original Morgan Library building, 33 East 36th Street. Built 1903-1906 ; Architect: Charles McKim of McKim, Meade & White. This room originally served as Belle Greene's study. Greene was the librarian in charge of J. Pierpont Morgan's library from 1905 until 1924 and director of the Pierpont Morgan Library from 1924 until 1948.
Lion, New York Public Library, 475 Fifth Avenue, 2008
Profile view of one of the two lions which sit on the terraced steps leading to New York Public Library's main entrance on Fifth Avenue. New York Public Library; Built: 1911; Architects: Carrere & Hastings. NYPL was formed in 1895 by the merger of the Astor Library, the Lenox Library, and the Tilden Trust. In 1901 the New York Free Circulating Library merged with the Astor-Lenox-Tilden Library, making the newly formed institution eligible for funds donated to the city by Andrew Carnegie. The library building was completed in 1911. Carrere & Hastings' design was a high point of Beaux Arts architecture in the U.S. The decorative program included urns, flagpoles, sculpture, and fountains. The entrance is flanked by twin lions carved by E.C. Potter.
Lower level, Morgan Library, 2009
Lower level of the Morgan Library's renovated campus, 225 Madison Avenue. Built: 2006. Architect: Renzo Piano. The expansion project integrated the three existing buildings on the Morgan's campus and added additional exhibition space.
Lunette, Rotunda, Morgan Library, 2009
View of the old entrance to the Morgan library, 33 East 36th Street. Built 1903-1906 ; Architect: Charles McKim of McKim, Meade & White. The rotunda connected the building's three main rooms: J.P. Morgan's study, J.P. Morgan's library, and the librarian's office. Visitors now enter through a side door which connects the McKim building to the Renzo Piano atrium. The rotunda's dome rises above the composite capitals of the hall's white marble pilasters and green marble columns. The dome's murals are by Henry Siddons Mowbray who looked to Italian Renaissance prototypes when designing his decorative scheme. Pictured is the lunette on the west wall of the rotunda. Mowbray's mural depicts the muse of Lyrical Poetry flanked by poets Tasso and Petrarch.
Madison Avenue and 42nd Street, 1976.
East 42nd Street and Madison Ave. Grand Central Terminal. Photo marked "1976". Photograph torn along bottom edge. View looking away from Grand Central toward SW corner of Madison Avenue and 42nd Street.
Madison Avenue looking north from 35th Street, 1925.
Madison Avenue and East 35th Street.
Madison Avenue looking north from 35th Street, 2008.
Madison Avenue and East 35th Street, 2008.
Madison Avenue looking north from 39th - 40th Streets, 1976.
Madison Avenue looking north from 39th - 40th Streets. Photo marked "1976"
Madison Avenue looking north from 39th - 40th Streets, 2008.
Madison Avenue and East 39th Street, 2008.
Madison Avenue looking north from 39th - 40th Streets.
Madison Avenue looking north from 39th - 40th Streets. Northeast corner of 39th Street demolished in 1925.
Marble hall, Morgan Library, 2009
Marble Hall, Morgan Library, 29 East 36th Street, 2009. Following J.P. Morgan's death his home on the corner of Madison Avenue and E. 36th Street was razed and an addition to his library built on the site. Though the two buildings appeared to be separate they connected through a back corridor. Built: 1928; Architect: Benjamin W. Morris. The Marble Hall connects the East and West Galleries in Benjamin Morris's addition to the original Morgan Library building. Morris's Italian Renaissance-inspired building complements the classicism of the Morgan Library's original 1906 building. Key decorative features of the Marble Hall include the inlaid marble floor and the metalwork ceiling panels.
Morgan Library and Annex, 29-33 East 36th Street, 2008.
Morgan Library and Annex, 29-33 East 36th Street. Library built 1903-1906 ; Architect: Charles McKim of McKim, Meade & White. The Annex added 1928 on the site of J.P. Morgan's former residence ; Architect: Benjamin W. Morris. McKim's original 1906 library was built in an Italian Renaissance Eclectic Style using the dry masonry technique. The 1928 Annex followed Florentine Renaissance design principles. Sculptures by Edward Clark Potter and Andrew O'Connor decorate the exterior of the McKim building.
Morgan Library and Annex, 29-33 East 36th Street.
Morgan Library and Annex, 29-33 East 36th Street. Library built 1903-1906 ; Architect: Charles McKim of McKim, Meade & White. The Annex added 1928 on the site of J.P. Morgan's former residence ; Architect: Benjamin W. Morris. McKim's original 1906 library (foreground) was built in an Italian Renaissance Eclectic Style using the dry masonry technique. The 1928 Annex (background) followed Florentine Renaissance design principles. Sculptures by Edward Clark Potter and Andrew O'Connor decorate the exterior of the McKim building. Caption reads: J. Pierpont Morgan Library; E. 36th St.
Morgan Library and J.P. Morgan home, 29-33 East 36th Street, 1920
Morgan Library and J.P. Morgan home; 36th Street looking west from Park Avenue, 1920. Library built 1903-1906 ; Architect: Charles McKim of McKim, Meade & White. J.P. Morgan's home, partially visible in the background, was razed in 1928 to make way for the library Annex building.
Morgan Library, 225 Madison Avenue, 2008.
Madison Avenue entrance to the Morgan Library. Built in 2006. Architect: Renzo Piano. The entrance was added as part of an expansion project which integrated the three existing buildings on the Morgan's campus and added additional exhibition space. Renzo Piano's design brings together three existing buildings: 1.) The original library building built 1903-1906 ; Architect: Charles McKim of McKim, Meade & White; 2.) The Annex added 1928 on the site of J.P. Morgan's former residence ; Architect: Benjamin W. Morris; 3.) The J. P. Morgan, Jr. House, built in 1852 and later owned by the Lutheran Church in America. It was acquired by the Pierpont Morgan Library in 1988.
Murray Hill Hotel, 1918.
Murray Hill Hotel, Park Avenue, west side between 40th and 41st Streets, 1918. The Murray Hill Hotel; Built: 1884; Razed: 1947; Architect: Stephen D. Hatch. Owner Hugh Smith developed the 600 room hotel just blocks from Grand Central Terminal on a site which previously housed stables for the Madison Ave. stagecoach lines. The enormous red brick building was arranged around two courtyards. The main entrance was a colonnaded portico above which the building rose to a gable. It was demolished in 1947 to make way for an office building at 100 Park Avenue.
Murray Hill Theatre, 1904.
Lexington Avenue and East 42nd Street. The theater's entrances are on 42nd Street and Lexington Avenue. The Murray Hill Theatre was constructed on land owned by the Goelet Estate; Built: 1896. Razed: 1950. Frank B. Murtha was the theater's first manager. William Morris later took over and converted it to vaudeville. In 1909 Marcus Loew bought the building and re-named it Loews 42nd Street. The site is now home to the Socony-Mobil Building. Poitier & Stymus furniture company is also visible in the photograph.
New York Public Library seen from the east side of Fifth Avenue, 2008
Facade of New York Public Library seen from across Fifth Avenue. The triple arched entrance is partially covered due to renovation. New York Public Library; Built: 1911; Architects: Carrere & Hastings. NYPL was formed in 1895 by the merger of the Astor Library, the Lenox Library, and the Tilden Trust. In 1901 the New York Free Circulating Library merged with the Astor-Lenox-Tilden Library, making the newly formed institution eligible for funds donated to the city by Andrew Carnegie. The library building was completed in 1911. Carrere & Hastings' design was a high point of Beaux Arts architecture in the U.S. The decorative program included urns, flagpoles, sculpture, and fountains. The entrance is flanked by twin lions carved by E.C. Potter.
Northeast corner of Lexington Avenue and 35th Street, 1976.
Lexington Avenue and East 35th Street. Built: 1940. This site previously home to the Church of St. John the Baptist.
Northeast corner of Lexington Avenue and 35th Street, 2008.
Lexington Avenue and East 35th Street. Built: 1940. This site previously home to the Church of St. John the Baptist.
Northwest corner of Park Avenue and 40th Street, 1976
Park Avenue and East 40th Street.
Old Carriage Houses, 155-161 East 35th Street, 1935.
Drawing of old carriage houses, 155-161 East 35th Street, looking west from Third Avenue, 1935. Minor tears on bottom center of drawing. Group of four carriage houses. 155 and 157 E. 35th Street, built: 1901. 159 and 161 E. 35th Street, built: 1910. All four buildings are now residential units.
Old Carriage Houses, 1929.
Old carriage houses, 155-161 East 35th Street, 1929. Group of four carriage houses. 155 and 157 E. 35th Street, built: 1901. 159 and 161 E. 35th Street, built: 1910. All four buildings are now residential units.
Old Carriage Houses, 1976.
Old carriage houses, 155-161 East 35th Street. This photo marked "1976". Group of four carriage houses. 155 and 157 E. 35th Street, built: 1901. 159 and 161 E. 35th Street, built: 1910. All four buildings are now residential units.
Old Carriage Houses, 2008.
Old carriage houses, 155-161 East 35th Street, 2008. Group of four carriage houses. 155 and 157 E. 35th Street, built: 1901. 159 and 161 E. 35th Street, built: 1910. All four buildings are now residential units.
Old Residence on Madison Avenue and 40th Street, 1865.
Drawing of an residence on Madison Avenue and East 40th Street from D. T. Valentine's Manual, 1865.
Old Residences on Murray Hill, Lexington Avenue and East 37th Street, 1858.
Lexington Avenue and East 37th Street. Caption reads: A. Weingarnter's Lithy. N.Y., for D. T. Valentine's Manual / Drawing of Old Residences on Murray Hill, Lexington Avenue near 37th Street on the Old Boston Post Road, 1858. These three houses on Lexington Avenue above 34th Street were built by Quaker merchants: Isaac Wright, Jeremiah Thompson, and Francis Thompson (his brother).
Old Stables, 29-39 East 35th Street, 1931.
Old Stables, 29-39 East 35th Street, 1931.
Old auction lot map of 36th and 37th Streets between Madison and Park Avenues.
Madison Ave. and East 37th Street. The only remaining buildings are the brownstone on the north side of 37th Street and the Morgan Library's Book Store building (formerly the Lutheran Church in America) on Madison and 37th Street. Circa 1860's. Caption: E.H. Ludlow Auctioneer.
Park Ave Tunnel near 33rd Street, 1900
Park Avenue South and East 33rd Street. Park Avenue tunnel entrance near 33rd Street during construction of subway, 1900. Caption reads: (538) 4" Ave near 33" St.; 12-1-1900. Image badly damaged along the right side.
Park Ave looking west on 39th Street, 1936.
Park Avenue and East 39th Street. Princeton Club at left. Princeton Club; Expansion: 1922-1923; Razed: c. 1961; Architect: Aymar Embury II. The Club bought the former home of Frederick Jennings, a Princeton alum, in 1922 and proceeded to renovate and expand it, adding a 10 story building that included squash courts and a restaurant. The Princeton, Brown, and Dartmouth Clubs were all demolished to make way for an office building that was built at 90 Park Avenue in 1963.
Park Ave near 37th Street, northeast side, 1915.
Park Avenue and East 37th Street. Garden established by residents to beautify this vacant lot, 1915.
Park Avenue Tunnel entrance near 33rd Street, 1976
Park Avenue South and East 33rd Street.
Park Avenue and 34th Street, 1925.
Park Avenue looking north from 34th Street, 1925. Grand Central Terminal visible in the background.
Park Avenue and 34th Street, 1976.
Park Avenue and 34th Street, southeast corner. Photo marked "1976". 3 Park Avenue, 111 East 33rd Street; Built: 1977; Architects: Shreve, Lamb & Harmon. The Norman Thomas High School occupies the first 11 floors. The school's address is on 33rd Street . The remaining 31 stories are used as offices. This site was previously home to the 71st Regiment Armory.
Park Avenue and 34th Street, 2008.
Park Avenue and 34th Street, southeast corner .3 Park Avenue, 111 East 33rd Street; Built: 1977; Architects: Shreve, Lamb & Harmon. The Norman Thomas High School occupies the first 11 floors. The school's address is on 33rd Street . The remaining 31 stories are used as offices. This site was previously home to the 71st Regiment Armory.
Park Avenue and 38th Street, 2008
Park Avenue and East 38th Street, looking north towards Grand Central Terminal.
Park Avenue and 38th Street.
Park Avenue and East 38th Street, looking north towards Grand Central Terminal. Grand Central Terminal visible on Park Avenue and 42nd Street.
Park Avenue and 39th Street, 1976.
Park Avenue looking west on 39th Street. This photo marked "1976".
Park Avenue and 40th Street, 1976.
Park Avenue and 40th Street. Photo marked "1976". View up Park Avenue to Grand Central Terminal.

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