CUNY Graduate Center Collection, Murray Hill

This digital collection is made up of 280 images depicting the Murray Hill Neighborhood in Manhattan. It includes historical photographs as well as newly commissioned ones that show how the neighborhood has changed over time.

Learn More About the Collection

Pages

Entrance, 123 East 35th Street, 2008.
Entrance, 123 E. 35th Street. Originally the James F. D. Lanier House. Built 1901-1903 ; Architect: Hoppin & Koen. The 33 foot wide, 3 bay home replaced two earlier brownstone rowhouses. The Beaux Arts mansion was built by James F. D. Lanier, a banker, and his wife, Harriet Bishop Lanier.
Entrance, Grand Central Terminal, 87 East 42nd Street, 2008
Entrances to Grand Central Terminal on 42nd Street. Grand Central Terminal built 1903-1913. Architects: Reed & Stem, Warren & Wetmore. Restoration: 1998. The Beaux Arts railroad station was built on the same site as its predecessor, Grand Central Depot. The clock and structural group which top the main 42nd Street façade are by sculptor Jules Félix Coutan.
Entrance, Morgan Library, 225 Madison Avenue, 2009
Entrance to the Morgan Library from Madison Avenue, 2009. Madison Avenue entrance to the Morgan Library. Built: 2006. Architect: Renzo Piano. The entrance was added as part of an expansion project which integrated the three existing buildings on the Morgan's campus and added additional exhibition space.
Entrance, The New Church, 112 East 35th Street, 1977.
Photograph of church entrance, 112 East 35th Street. Land deeded to the Church in 1854; church built 1858 in the Renaissance revival style. In 1866 the building was extended in front. Architects: Charles D. Gambrill and George B. Post. Original front entrance moved to the side as part of renovations done in 1901 by York and Sawyer.
Entrance, The New Church, 2008.
Photograph of church entrance, 112 East 35th Street. Land deeded to the Church in 1854; church built 1858 in the Renaissance revival style. In 1866 the building was extended in front. Architects: Charles D. Gambrill and George B. Post. Original front entrance moved to the side as part of renovations done in 1901 by York and Sawyer.
Facade, Grand Central Station, 2008.
Grand Central Terminal, 87 East 42nd Street. Grand Central Terminal built 1903-1913. Architects: Reed & Stem, Warren & Wetmore. Restoration: 1998. The Beaux Arts railroad station was built on the same site as its predecessor, Grand Central Depot. The clock and structural group which top the main 42nd Street façade are by sculptor Jules Félix Coutan.
Facade, New York Public Library, 475 Fifth Avenue, 2008
Facade of New York Public Library. Terraced steps lead up to the triple arched entrance porch which is partially covered due to renovation. New York Public Library; Built: 1911; Architects: Carrere & Hastings. NYPL was formed in 1895 by the merger of the Astor Library, the Lenox Library, and the Tilden Trust. In 1901 the New York Free Circulating Library merged with the Astor-Lenox-Tilden Library, making the newly formed institution eligible for funds donated to the city by Andrew Carnegie. The library building was completed in 1911. Carrere & Hastings' design was a high point of Beaux Arts architecture in the U.S. The decorative program included urns, flagpoles, sculpture, and fountains. The entrance is flanked by twin lions carved by E.C. Potter.
Facade, Renzo Piano addition to the Morgan Library, 2009
View from Madison Avenue of architect Renzo Piano's entrance to the Morgan Library, 225 Madison Avenue. Madison Avenue entrance to the Morgan Library. Built: 2006. Architect: Renzo Piano. The entrance was added as part of an expansion project which integrated the three existing buildings on the Morgan's campus and added additional exhibition space.
Fifth Avenue and 34th Street, 1976.
Fifth Avenue and West 34th Street. Photo marked "1976." Northwest corner of 5th Avenue and 34th Street. Previously the site of the Knickerbocker Trust Company Building.
Fifth Avenue and 34th Street, 2008.
Northwest corner of 5th Avenue and 34th Street. Previously the site of the Knickerbocker Trust Company Building.
Fifth Avenue and 39th Street, northeast corner, 2008.
Fifth Avenue and 39th Street - northeast corner. The Mid-Manhattan Library occupies the former Arnold Constable building, a six-story Beaux Arts structure. Architect: T. Joseph Bartley. Built on the site of William H. Vanderbilt's former residence.
Fifth Avenue and 39th Street, northwest corner, 2008.
Fifth Avenue and West 39th Street. Wendel family home built on this site in 1856 and razed in 1934. An S.H. Kress store built here in 1935 was razed in 1986. An office building now stands on the site.
Fifth Avenue and East 39th Street, 1976.
Fifth Avenue and 39th Street - northeast corner. Photo marked "1976." F.W. Woolworth's in the foreground; Mid-Manhattan Branch Library in the background.
Fifth Avenue and East 39th Street, 1994.
Fifth Avenue and 39th Street - northeast corner. Photo marked "1994." The Mid-Manhattan Library occupies the former Arnold Constable building, a six-story Beaux Arts structure. Architect: T. Joseph Bartley. Built on the site of William H. Vanderbilt's former residence.
Fifth Avenue and East 42nd Street, 1898.
Fifth Avenue, east side looking north from 42nd - 43rd Streets, 1898. Fifth Avenue omnibus drawn by three horses.
Fifth Avenue and East 42nd Street, 2008.
View looking down the east side of Fifth Avenue from 42nd Street.
Fifth Avenue and East 42nd Street, 2008.
Fifth Avenue, east side looking north from 42nd - 43rd Streets, 2008.
Fifth Avenue at 40th Street, 2008.
Fifth Avenue and East 40th Street
Fifth Avenue entrance, New York Public Library, 2008
Main entrance, New York Public Library, 475 Fifth Avenue. The arched porch is partially covered due to renovation. New York Public Library; Built: 1911; Architects: Carrere & Hastings. NYPL was formed in 1895 by the merger of the Astor Library, the Lenox Library, and the Tilden Trust. In 1901 the New York Free Circulating Library merged with the Astor-Lenox-Tilden Library, making the newly formed institution eligible for funds donated to the city by Andrew Carnegie. The library building was completed in 1911. Carrere & Hastings' design was a high point of Beaux Arts architecture in the U.S. The decorative program included urns, flagpoles, sculpture, and fountains. The entrance is flanked by twin lions carved by E.C. Potter.
Fifth Avenue looking north from 40th Street, 1916.
Fifth Avenue and East 40th Street. New York Public Library, Bristol Hotel, 1916. New York Public Library's science and humanities research library is a white marble Beaux Arts structure which takes up 2 city blocks. Built: 1911. Architects: Carrere & Hastings. The marble building has a rusticated base and is fronted by a deep-set portico embellished with Corinthian columns. Hotel Bristol sat on the NW corner of 5th Ave. and 42nd St. By 1920 the building was being used as office space.
Fifth Avenue looking north from 40th Street, 1976.
Fifth Avenue and East 40th Street. Photo marked "1976." New York Public Library partially visible. Image is discolored and scratched.
Fifth Avenue looking north from 40th Street, 2008.
Fifth Avenue and East 40th Street. New York Public Library partially visible.
Fifth Avenue looking south from 42nd Street, 1927.
475 Fifth Avenue. Fifth Avenue looking south from 42nd Street, towards New York Public Library, 1927. New York Public Library; Built: 1911; Architects: Carrere & Hastings. NYPL was formed in 1895 by the merger of the Astor Library, the Lenox Library, and the Tilden Trust. In 1901 the New York Free Circulating Library merged with the Astor-Lenox-Tilden Library, making the newly formed institution eligible for funds donated to the city by Andrew Carnegie. The library building was completed in 1911. Carrere & Hastings' design was a high point of Beaux Arts architecture in the U.S. The decorative program included urns, flagpoles, sculpture, and fountains. The entrance is flanked by twin lions carved by E.C. Potter.
Fifth Avenue looking south from 42nd Street, 1976.
Fifth Avenue and W. 42nd Street. Fifth Avenue looking south from 42nd Street towards New York Public Library, 1976. Image is discolored. New York Public Library built: 1911. Architects: Carrere & Hastings
Fifth Avenue looking south from 42nd Street, 1994.
Fifth Avenue and W. 42nd Street. Fifth Avenue looking south from 42nd Street towards New York Public Library. Photo marked 1994. New York Public Library built: 1911. Architects: Carrere & Hastings
Fifth Avenue looking south from 42nd Street, 2008.
Fifth Avenue looking south from 42nd Street towards New York Public Library, 2008. New York Public Library built: 1911. Architects: Carrere & Hastings
Fifth Church of Christ Scientist, Madison Avenue and 38th Street, southeast corner, 1915.
Fifth Church of Christ Scientist, Madison Ave. and East 38th Street, 1915. Formerly occupied by the Dutch Reform Church. Caption: Underhill Photographer, New York
Fireplace, Librarian's office, Morgan Library, 2009
Librarian's office, Morgan Library, 33 East 36th Street, 2009. One of a suite of three rooms in the original Morgan Library building, 33 East 36th Street. Built 1903-1906 ; Architect: Charles McKim of McKim, Meade & White. This room originally served as Belle Greene's study. Greene was the librarian in charge of J. Pierpont Morgan's library from 1905 until 1924 and director of the Pierpont Morgan Library from 1924 until 1948.
Fountain, New York Public Library, 475 Fifth Avenue, 2008
Sculptural grouping set into a recessed half-domed niche. Fountain below. Sculptor: Frederick MacMonnies. New York Public Library; Built: 1911; Architects: Carrere & Hastings. NYPL was formed in 1895 by the merger of the Astor Library, the Lenox Library, and the Tilden Trust. In 1901 the New York Free Circulating Library merged with the Astor-Lenox-Tilden Library, making the newly formed institution eligible for funds donated to the city by Andrew Carnegie. The library building was completed in 1911. Carrere & Hastings' design was a high point of Beaux Arts architecture in the U.S. The decorative program included urns, flagpoles, sculpture, and fountains. The entrance is flanked by twin lions carved by E.C. Potter.
Fourth Ave looking north from 32nd Street, 1875.
Fourth Avenue (now Park Avenue South) in 1875 looking north from 32nd Street. Train exit from tunnel is visible two blocks up at 34th Street.
Fraternity Clubs Building, 22 East 38th Street, 1927.
Fraternity Clubs Building, 22 East 38th Street, east side looking south from 38th Street, 1927. Fraternities Club Building; Built: 1922-1924; Architect: Murgatroyd & Ogden. The club was built by the Allerton Hotel chain specifically for members of college fraternities. The medieval Italian-style building had meeting rooms for Greek organizations and 560 guest rooms. Several university clubs, including Notre Dame, Cornell, and Harvard, were once housed in the building as well.
Fraternity Clubs Building, 22 East 38th Street, 2008.
Fraternity Clubs Building, 22 East 38th Street, east side looking south from 38th Street, 2008. Fraternities Club Building; Built: 1922-1924; Architect: Murgatroyd & Ogden. The club was built by the Allerton Hotel chain specifically for members of college fraternities. The medieval Italian-style building had meeting rooms for Greek organizations and 560 guest rooms. Several university clubs, including Notre Dame, Cornell, and Harvard, were once housed in the building as well.
General view, Morgan Library atrium, 2009
General view, Morgan Library atrium, 225 Madison Avenue, 2009. Central atrium of the Morgan Library. Built: 2006. Architect: Renzo Piano. The atrium was added as part of an expansion project which integrated the three existing buildings on the Morgan's campus and added additional exhibition space. This general view faces towards the Madison Avenue entrance. The structure of the glass elevator and attendant platforms is clearly delineated. The glass-paneled ceiling is partially visible.
Grand Central Depot, 1870's.
East 42nd Street and Park Avenue North. Grand Central Depot - 1870's. Grand Central Depot opened in 1871 for the New York and Harlem Railroad and the New Haven Railroad. Architect: John B. Snook in association with engineer Isaac C. Buckhout. Original glass and metal train shed designed by R.G. Hatfield. Snook and Buckhout's designed the depot in the American Second Empire Style using red pressed brick and cast iron trim. The train shed was razed in 1903 when construction for the new Grand Central Terminal began.
Grand Central Depot, 1890.
East 42nd Street and Park Avenue North. Grand Central Depot, 1890. Grand Central Depot opened in 1871 for the New York and Harlem Railroad and the New Haven Railroad. Architect: John B. Snook in association with engineer Isaac C. Buckhout. Original glass and metal train shed designed by R.G. Hatfield. Snook and Buckhout's designed the depot in the American Second Empire Style using red pressed brick and cast iron trim. The train shed was razed in 1903 when construction for the new Grand Central Terminal began.
Grand Central Terminal, 87 East 42nd Street, 1921.
Grand Central, 1921, looking east on 42nd Street, 1921. Grand Central Terminal built 1903-1913. Architects: Reed & Stem, Warren & Wetmore. Restoration: 1998. The Beaux Arts railroad station was built on the same site as its predecessor, Grand Central Depot. The clock and structural group which top the main 42nd Street façade are by sculptor Jules Félix Coutan.
Grand Central Terminal, 87 East 42nd Street, 1976.
Grand Central Terminal looking east on 42nd Street, 1976. Grand Central Terminal built 1903-1913. Architects: Reed & Stem, Warren & Wetmore. Restoration: 1998. The Beaux Arts railroad station was built on the same site as its predecessor, Grand Central Depot. The clock and structural group which top the main 42nd Street façade are by sculptor Jules Félix Coutan.
Grand Central Terminal, 87 East 42nd Street, 1994.
Grand Central Terminal looking east on 42nd Street,1994. Grand Central Terminal built 1903-1913. Architects: Reed & Stem, Warren & Wetmore. Restoration: 1998. The Beaux Arts railroad station was built on the same site as its predecessor, Grand Central Depot. The clock and structural group which top the main 42nd Street façade are by sculptor Jules Félix Coutan.
Grand Central Terminal, 87 East 42nd Street, 2008.
Grand Central Terminal looking east on 42nd Street, 2008. Grand Central Terminal built 1903-1913. Architects: Reed & Stem, Warren & Wetmore. Restoration: 1998. The Beaux Arts railroad station was built on the same site as its predecessor, Grand Central Depot. The clock and structural group which top the main 42nd Street façade are by sculptor Jules Félix Coutan.
Grand Central Terminal, 87 East 42nd Street, 2008.
Grand Central Terminal built 1903-1913. Architects: Reed & Stem, Warren & Wetmore. Restoration: 1998. The Beaux Arts railroad station was built on the same site as its predecessor, Grand Central Depot. The clock and structural group which top the main 42nd Street façade are by sculptor Jules Félix Coutan.
Grand Union Hotel, 1914.
Grand Union Hotel, Park Avenue between 41st and 42nd Streets, east side, 1914. Grand Central Terminal partially visible on the left. Foreground is the Grand Union Hotel; Built: 1872; Razed: 1914; Architect: Edward Schott. The hotel was demolished in 1914 to make way for the Lexington Avenue subway line.
Interior with view of Phelps Stokes house, Morgan Library atrium, 2009
Interior, Morgan Library atrium, 225 Madison Avenue, 2009. Central atrium of the Morgan Library. Built: 2006. Architect: Renzo Piano. The atrium was added as part of an expansion project which integrated the three existing buildings on the Morgan's campus and added additional exhibition space. To the left is visible the exterior wall of the Phelps Stokes House, which was home to J.P. Morgan, Jr. from 1904 until his death in 1943. Following J.P. Morgan, Jr.'s death his estate sold the property to the United Lutheran Church in America. In 1988 the church sold the building to the Pierpont Morgan Library and it was repurposed as a museum building.
Interior, Morgan Library atrium, 2009
Interior, Morgan Library atrium, 225 Madison Avenue, 2009. Madison Avenue entrance to the Morgan Library. Built: 2006. Architect: Renzo Piano. The entrance was added as part of an expansion project which integrated the three existing buildings on the Morgan's campus and added additional exhibition space. Renzo Piano's design brings together three existing buildings: 1.) The original library building built 1903-1906 ; Architect: Charles McKim of McKim, Meade & White; 2.) The Annex added 1928 on the site of J.P. Morgan's former residence ; Architect: Benjamin W. Morris; 3.) The J. P. Morgan, Jr. House, built in 1852 and later owned by the Lutheran Church in America. It was acquired by the Pierpont Morgan Library in 1988.
Iron railing, 123 East 35th Street.
Iron railing, 123 E. 35th Street. Originally the James F. D. Lanier House. Built 1901-1903 ; Architect: Hoppin & Koen.
J. P. Morgan Home, 219 Madison Avenue
J. P. Morgan Home, Madison Avenue and 36th Street. J.P. Morgan's home; Built: 1853; Razed: 1928. John Jay Phelps built the Italianate mansion as one of three identical brownstone homes on the block of Madison Avenue between 36th and 37th Streets. The other two homes were built by Isaac N. Phelps and William E. Dodge. J.P. Morgan, Sr. bought the Phelps home in 1882. He made few changes to the 3 story exterior but modernized the inside of the house considerably. In 1928 the house was demolished to make way for the Morgan Library Annex.
J. P. Morgan House, J. P. Morgan, Jr. House, DeLamar Mansion, 1920's.
J. P. Morgan House, J. P. Morgan, Jr. House, DeLamar Mansion; looking north on Madison Avenue from 36th Street, 1920's. The DeLamar Mansion (background) is now the Polish Consulate building. J.P. Morgan's house (foreground) was demolished and replaced in 1928 with the Morgan Library Annex. The J. P. Morgan, Jr. House (center) ; Built : 1853; Expanded: 1888; Expansion architect: R. H. Robertson. Originally built by Isaac Newton Phelps, his daughter Helen and her husband Anson Stokes doubled the building's size and added Neo-Renaissance characteristics to the Italianate style home in 1888. The mansion was renovated again when J.P. Morgan, Sr. bought the mansion for his son in 1904. Following J.P. Morgan, Jr.'s death in 1943 his estate sold the property to the United Lutheran Church in America. In 1988 the church sold the building to the Pierpont Morgan Library and it was repurposed as a museum building.
J.P. Morgan's Library, Morgan Library, 2009
J.P. Morgan's library. One of a suite of three rooms in the original Morgan Library building, 33 East 36th Street. Built 1903-1906 ; Architect: Charles McKim of McKim, Meade & White. The library opens off of the east side of the rotunda. This photograph shows the room's east wall, which is lined with wooden bookshelves holding volumes from Morgan's collection. The ceiling-high tiered shelving is broken by a massive Italian Renaissance fireplace. Above the fireplace hangs a 16th century Flemish tapestry depicting the Triumph of Avarice. Henry Siddons Mowbray created the murals which decorate the room's ceiling. Visible in this image are the lunettes and spandrels formed by the ceiling's groin vaults. The design of the spandrels was inspired by ornamentation Mowbray saw at the Villa Farnesina in Rome. The lunettes alternate between female muses and portraits of historical leaders.
J.P. Morgan's study, Morgan Library, 2009
J.P. Morgan's study. One of a suite of three rooms in the original Morgan Library building, 33 East 36th Street. Built 1903-1906 ; Architect: Charles McKim of McKim, Meade & White. Morgan's study opens off the west side of the library's rotunda. The room's original furnishings remain intact and they are supplemented with additional works of art from the Morgan collection. The red silk wall coverings copy hangings from the Chigi Palace in Rome. Architect Charles McKim purchased the antique Italian wooden ceiling in 1905 but its exact origins remain unknown. The studio of Desiderio da Settignano is traditionally credited with creating the room's marble fireplace. Hanging above the fireplace is a portrait of Pierpont Morgan by painter Frank Holl.
John D. Wendel Home and Barn, 1932.
Fifth Avenue and West 39th Street. John D. Wendel Home and Barn, Fifth Avenue and 39th Street - northwest corner. 1932. Wendel home built: 1856; razed: 1934. The house remained in the Wendel family for 3 generations. When the final heir died in 1931 she left the house to Drew University. The school leased the site to the S.H. Kress store chain which built its flagship on the site in 1935. The brick wall behind the Wendel's barn features a prominent advertisement reading: If you are not slender make Lane Bryant your fashion counselor.
John D. Wendel Home and Barn, 39th Street, 1932.
Fifth Avenue and West 39th Street. View of the barn, John D. Wendel Home, Fifth Avenue and 39th Street - northwest corner, 1932. Wendel home built: 1856; razed: 1934. The house remained in the Wendel family for 3 generations. When the final heir died in 1931 she left the house to Drew University. The school leased the site to the S.H. Kress store chain which built its flagship on the site in 1935.

Pages

Islandora Bookmark

Bookmarks: