WCS Library, New York Aquarium Postcards

The New York Aquarium is the oldest continually operating aquarium in the United States, having opened in Castle Garden in Battery Park, Manhattan in 1896. Since 1957, it has been located on the boardwalk in Coney Island, Brooklyn. The Aquarium has a long history as a beloved New York City attraction, and the 75 postcards on display here show off the sights that have dazzled its viewers over the years.

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Porpoises
Back caption: Porpoises. Captured at Cape Hatteras, N.C. Porpoises are air breathing, milk giving, warm blooded aquatic mammals of the whale order. These are the only specimens of their kind in captivity.
Pudding wife fish
Back caption: Pudding wife fish, at the Government Aquarium and Museum, Bermuda. Painted by Dr. Andrey Avinoff, eminent naturalist, entomologist, artist, and late Director of the Carnegie Museum, Pittsburgh, Pa.
Queen angel fish
Back caption: New York Aquarium / (Stage One, on the ocean front at Coney Island) / Queen angel fish / Angelichthys ciliaris
Queen angelfish and moray
Back caption: Queen Angelfish and Moray, at the Government Aquarium and Museum, Bermuda. Painted by Dr. Andrey Avinoff, eminent naturalist, entomologist, artist, and late Director of the Carnegie Museum, Pittsburgh, Pa.
Queen trigger fish
Front caption: Queen Trigger Fish -- New York Aquarium
Queen trigger-fish
Back caption: Queen Trigger-Fish / From a painting by Chas. R. Knight / Florida and West Indies. Shows four different phases of color. Can change color instantly.
Rock beauty
Back caption: New York Aquarium / (Stage One, on the ocean front at Coney Island) / Rock beauty / Holacanthus tricolor
Sargassum fish
Back caption: New York Aquarium / (Stage One, on the ocean front at Coney Island) / Sargassum fish / Histrio histrio
Sea horse
Front caption: The Sea Horse (Hippocampus hudsonius) is found along the Atlantic Coast from Massachusetts to Florida. It reaches a length of nearly seven inches. The largest species known, inhabiting the west coast of Mexico, attains a length of twelve inches. The eggs of the sea horse are carried in a pouch by the male until hatched. The sea horse is the only fish with a grasping tail. It is usually brownish in color, but specimens have been received which were entirely yellow. The head is horse-like in appearance. The entire fish is enclosed in a bony coat of mail, inflexible except in neck and tail. The specimens exhibited in the New York Aquarium are captured late in summer in the bays of Long Island and New Jersey. They are kept in a tank of flowing sea water and are fed on minute crustacea called Gammarus, gathered from sea weed along the ocean beaches. The sea horse requires live food and will not live without it. It has not yet been successfully kept in small aquaria. Being strictly marine, it cannot live in fresh water. Dealers in aquaria supplies do not attempt to keep it. Many of the sea horses kept in the New York Aquarium have bred in captivity, but the young have never been raised, as suitable live food has not yet been discovered for mouths so small as those of young sea horses.
Sea horse -- New York Aquarium
Back caption: Sea-Horse / Atlantic coast. Sometimes found in New York bay. One of the few fishes with a grasping tail. Grows seven inches long.
Sea horses
Front caption: Sea Horses -- New York Aquarium
Seahorse
Back caption: New York Aquarium / (Stage One, on the ocean front at Coney Island) / Seahorse / Hippocampus hudsonius
Sergeant major, New York Aquarium
Back caption: Butterfly fish. From Florida and the West Indies. Sometimes called four-eyes.
Shark and shark suckers
Back caption: Sand Shark with Shark Suckers / Shark-suckers attach themselves to Sharks by a suction disc on top of the head.
Short-nosed gar, New York Aquarium
Back caption: Short-Nosed Gar. Great Lakes and Mississippi Valley. Related to extinct Ganoid fishes.
Slender cichlid
Back caption: Elongate Cichlid / Crenicichla lepidota. A handsome fish not common in household aquaria. Native of South America.
Spade fish
Back caption: Spade fish. From Florida and West Indies. Reaches a weight of 20 pounds.
Spiny lobster
Back caption: Spiny Lobster. From Florida and West Indies. Much used for food. Lacks the formidable claws of the northern lobster.
Spiny lobster
Back caption: Spiny Lobster / From Flordia and West Indies. Grows very large; much used for food.
Spotted moray
Front caption: Spotted Moray -- New York Aquarium
Sturgeon and small shark
Back caption: Sturgeon and Small Shark. The sturgeon enters rivers from Maine to Florida to spawn. Reaches a weight of 500 pounds. Eggs used for caviar.
The happy family tank
Back caption: Happy Family Tank / Usually contains 15 or 20 kinds. All tropical. Florida and West Indies.
Wrasse fish
Back caption: Wrasse Fish, at the Government Aquarium and Museum, Bermuda. Painted by Dr. Andrey Avinoff, eminent naturalist, entomologist, artist, and late Director of the Carnegie Museum, Pittsburgh, Pa.
Yellow characin
Back caption: Yellow Characin / Hyphessobrycon bifasciatus. Popularly known as the Yellow Tetra, frequently kept in small aquaria. A native of Southeastern Brazil.

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